hypnogogic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

hypnogogic

(hĭp′nə-gŏj′ĭk, -gō′jĭk)
adj.
Variant of hypnagogic.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
He waits through the night with his hosts, undergoing hypnogogic images as he struggles to stay awake and warm.
Stage Description Duration W Wakefulness ~16 hours N1 Somnolence; "drowsy," easily awakened 1-5% N2 Asleep -50% N3 Slow Wave Sleep ~7% (SWS) Transition to deep sleep N4 Slow Wave Sleep ~20-25% (SWS) Deep sleep REM1-4 Rapid Eye Movement ~20-25% Stage EEG Brainwave pattern Events and abnormalities W Alpha waves Daytime consciousness N1 Theta waves Hypnogogic twitches, hallucinations N2 Slower waves, sleep spindles, K-complexes Unconsciousness N3 <50% delta waves Melatonin peak, (SWS) night terrors, parasomnias N4 >50% delta waves Minimum core temperature, (SWS) rebounds after deprivation REM1-4 Rapid low-voltage EEG Dreaming, low muscle tone, rebounds after deprivation
But Atsuko's lab is thrown into uproar when one of the four prototype DC-Minis goes missing and someone starts using it to invade Atsuko's colleagues' minds, planting a dream so powerful the victim falls into a permanent hypnogogic state in which he or she is still capable of walking around zombie-like and spouting nonsense.
Just going to sleep takes you through a hypnogogic phase - that natural trance state between wake and sleep which everybody experiences twice a day (it happens as you wake up too).
But it is the "unimaginable chaos" (9.266) of the dream itself, rather than the hypnogogic states that lead to and from it, that most strongly suggests the associative delirium that Deleuze attributes to the Humean model of mind.
Such triumphs of creativity are evidently not so much connected with characteristic deep-sleep (REM or rapid-eye-movement) dreaming as with the hypnogogic state--the penumbral phase of relaxation before one actually drifts off into unconsciousness.
They are excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy (sudden loss of muscle tone, usually in relation to strong emotions), hypnogogic hallucinations (seeing things that aren't real, particularly upon going to sleep or waking up), and sleep paralysis.
(1) At issue here is not the reality of demonic influence, but the commonality of it, and the possibility of mislabeling a hypnogogic or sociocognitive phenomenon as demonic.
Finally, even though Dali, who rested his chin upon a spoon in order to wake himself from a hypnogogic state (Mavromatis, 19 87), Edison, who claimed to hold two steel balls in his hand which woke him from his hypnogogic state (Mavromatis, 1987), and Freud, who used his dreams to develop a model of the mind (Freud, 1900/1976), all used their mental images in extraordinarily creative ways, the actual images themselves did not differ in extraordinary ways.
Brakhage's "Dante" is a poet of visionary and visual discriminations, rather than the social prophet of cosmic justice and redemption, and his homage to him is a series of handpainted films inspired by hypnogogic vision.
Well, there's the darkly wonderful, Raymond Carver-esque story "Sex and Food a Mouthful at a Time"; and the Ishmael Reed-like surrealism of shaman Joe Green's story in "The Idea Which Reality Seeks." Yes, there's also the bittersweet, Sherwood Anderson-grotesque feel of "Some Disease," and the Lovecraftian, bizarrely matter-of-fact narration of "The Amazing Hypnogogic Man." But it is the sixties stories, "Tales of the Hippies" and "Four Theses on the Fate of the Sixties," that I keep returning to in The Idea of Home.
By the way, these late-night physical jerks are called hypnogogic movements.