hypnogogic


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hypnogogic

(hĭp′nə-gŏj′ĭk, -gō′jĭk)
adj.
Variant of hypnagogic.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sleep of prisoners: Hypnogogic resonance and the vicissitudes of analyst sleep.
Just going to sleep takes you through a hypnogogic phase - that natural trance state between wake and sleep which everybody experiences twice a day (it happens as you wake up too).
266) of the dream itself, rather than the hypnogogic states that lead to and from it, that most strongly suggests the associative delirium that Deleuze attributes to the Humean model of mind.
Such triumphs of creativity are evidently not so much connected with characteristic deep-sleep (REM or rapid-eye-movement) dreaming as with the hypnogogic state--the penumbral phase of relaxation before one actually drifts off into unconsciousness.
They are excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy (sudden loss of muscle tone, usually in relation to strong emotions), hypnogogic hallucinations (seeing things that aren't real, particularly upon going to sleep or waking up), and sleep paralysis.
1) At issue here is not the reality of demonic influence, but the commonality of it, and the possibility of mislabeling a hypnogogic or sociocognitive phenomenon as demonic.
Finally, even though Dali, who rested his chin upon a spoon in order to wake himself from a hypnogogic state (Mavromatis, 19 87), Edison, who claimed to hold two steel balls in his hand which woke him from his hypnogogic state (Mavromatis, 1987), and Freud, who used his dreams to develop a model of the mind (Freud, 1900/1976), all used their mental images in extraordinarily creative ways, the actual images themselves did not differ in extraordinary ways.
Brakhage's "Dante" is a poet of visionary and visual discriminations, rather than the social prophet of cosmic justice and redemption, and his homage to him is a series of handpainted films inspired by hypnogogic vision.
Yes, there's also the bittersweet, Sherwood Anderson-grotesque feel of "Some Disease," and the Lovecraftian, bizarrely matter-of-fact narration of "The Amazing Hypnogogic Man.
By the way, these late-night physical jerks are called hypnogogic movements.