hypnagogic


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Related to hypnagogic: hypnopompic, Hypnagogic hallucinations, Hypnagogic imagery

hypnagogic

 [hip″nah-goj´ik]
1. hypnotic (def. 1).
2. occurring just before sleep; applied to hallucinations occurring at sleep onset.

hyp·na·gog·ic

(hip-nă-goj'ik), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation hypnogogic.
Denoting a transitional state, related to the hypnoidal, preceding sleep; applied also to various hallucinations that may manifest themselves at that time. See: hypnoidal.
[hypno- + G. agōgos, leading]

hypnagogic

/hyp·na·gog·ic/ (hip″nah-goj´ik)
1. hypnotic (1, 2).
2. occurring just before sleep; applied to hallucinations occurring at sleep onset.

hypnagogic

also

hypnogogic

(hĭp′nə-gŏj′ĭk, -gō′jĭk)
adj.
1. Inducing sleep; soporific.
2. Of, relating to, or occurring in the state of intermediate consciousness preceding sleep: hypnagogic hallucinations.

hypnagogic

hypnagogic

Referring to the semiconscious state just before sleep. Hallucinatory phenomena may occur during the hypnagogic state which have no pathological significance.

hyp·na·gog·ic

(hip'nă-goj'ik)
Denoting a transitional state, related to the hypnoidal, preceding sleep; applied also to various hallucinations that may manifest themselves at that time.
See also: hypnoidal
[hypno- + G. agōgos, leading]

hypnagogic

1. Causing sleep.
2. Pertaining to the period during which a person is falling asleep. Of images, dreams or hallucinations occurring during this period.

hyp·na·gog·ic

(hip'nă-goj'ik)
Denoting a transitional state, related to the hypnoidal, preceding sleep; applied also to various hallucinations.
[hypno- + G. agōgos, leading]

hypnagogic

producing sleep.
References in periodicals archive ?
GHB treatment has a high rate of success in reducing cataplexy, sleep attacks, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic hallucinations.
Narcolepsy: Excessive sleepiness with the uncontrollable urge to fall asleep, sudden muscle loss, sleep paralysis and hypnagogic hallucinations.
While excessive daytime sleepiness generally persists throughout life, sleep paralysis and hypnagogic hallucinations may not.
Barnhill's patient swayed the author though the patient already has a psychotic illness (as well as many other possible contributors such as drug use), but even in sleep disorders hypnopompic or hypnagogic hallucinations are neither exclusive to narcolepsy, nor particularly pathognomonic.
whether it be the hypnagogic substratum made visible, or the shapes of the real world" (Fantasm and Fiction: On Textual Envisioning [Stanford: Stanford UP, 1999] 160, n.
Face to face it was hard to tell if he was seeing you, or seeing around you, or seeing something else entirely--something internal, hypnagogic.
Many of the classic symptoms of narcolepsy, such as excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic hallucinations, may be mistakenly associated with other disease states and must be differentiated from other sleep disorders.
McClellan (1988) discussed an interesting form of visual experience known as hypnagogic images, which are known to occur at the onset of sleep and are typically represented by transient bursts of electrical activity in the anterior area of the brain.
Symptoms of narcolepsy include excessive daytime sleepiness (even dropping off to sleep at any time, whether it be watching TV or driving a car), cataplexy (brief episodes of muscle weakness brought on by strong emotion), sleep paralysis (inability to move occurring at the moment of failing asleep), and hypnagogic hallucinations (dreamlike images that occur at sleep onset).
9] Besides excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and uncontrollable sleep attacks, the classic symptoms of narcolepsy include: cataplexy (short episodes of muscle weakness and/or paralysis without change in consciousness that are precipitated by strong emotion); sleep paralysis (the inability to move muscles while falling asleep or on awakening); and hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations (dreamlike images occurring at sleep onset or on awakening, respectively).
This action explicated ought to help the reader encounter Will's "exceptional states of consciousness" in the remainder of the narration, which continue to include those in Fliess's Group II (sleep, derealization, depersonalization, and fantasy and delusion), but are joined by those in Group I (hypnosis, the hypnagogic state, the hypnopompic state, "sleepwalking," and hysterical twilight).
Replaying the Game: Hypnagogic Images in Normals and Amnesics," Science, 209 no.