hyphaema


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

hy·phe·ma

(hī-fē'mă)
Blood in the anterior chamber of the eye.
Synonym(s): hyphaema.
[G. hyphaimos, suffused with blood]

hyphaema

A layer of blood in the front chamber of the eye between the back of the CORNEA and the front of the IRIS. This usually results from blunt injury and in most cases the blood reabsorbs without complication and vision is restored. In some cases a serious secondary bleed occurs 3–5 days after the injury.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many complications from the trauma itself, such as hyphaema, lens dislocations or retinal detachments, as well as scleral rupture, may occur at the time of injury and contribute to permanent visual impairment.
The anterior chamber maintainer, which facilitates ophthalmological surgical procedures and reduces iatrogenic damage to the iris, corneal endothelium, and lens, has been used in the management of hard nuclear cataract lens [3], subluxation in young patients [4], endoscopic goniotomy [5], traumatic hyphaemas [6], congenital pupillary-irislens membrane [7], and spherophakia [8].
Stiles (2000) suggested that ocular symptoms of opacity of cornea, aqueous flare, hypopyon and hyphaema in dogs were important in diagnosis of ehrlichiosis and help in monitoring response to therapy.
The most frequent complication after surgery was mild hyphaema; the blood from the anterior chamber was fully absorbed within 1 week in all cases.
A hyphaema rate of 10% is not excessive when compared with previous reports, in which rates vary from 7% to 53%.
Out of the 5 patients who were conservatively managed, 3 were chemical injury patients and 2 were closed globe injuries presenting with hyphaema.
Table 3 shows that majority of the RTAs with ocular injuries could have been managed conservatively, while 15 (12.6%) cases required surgical repair of the eye lid, hyphaema aspiration and lens removal followed by IOL was performed in 4 (3.36%) each and 18 (15.13%) cases were managed by combination of various procedures.
Hyphaema is commonly associated with haemophilia, mostly in response to direct ocular trauma or following surgery (see Figure 3, page 58).
Spontaneous hyphaema and intra-bleb subconjunctival haemorrhage in a patient with previous trabeculectomy.
The eyes were the next most common site, with corneal abrasions/lacerations, hyphaema, foreign bodies and one eye requiring enucleation for globe disruption.