hypervitaminosis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hypervitaminosis

 [hi″per-vi″tah-mĭ-no´sis]
a condition produced by ingestion of excessive amounts of vitamins; symptom complexes are associated with excessive intake of vitamins A and D (hypervitaminosis A and hypervitaminosis D).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hy·per·vi·ta·min·o·sis

(hī'pĕr-vī'tă-mi-nō'sis),
A condition resulting from the ingestion of an excessive amount of a vitamin preparation, symptoms varying according to the particular vitamin involved; serious effects may be caused by overdosage with fat-soluble vitamins, especially A or D, but more rarely with water-soluble vitamins.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hypervitaminosis

(hī′pər-vī′tə-mə-nō′sĭs)
n. pl. hypervitamino·ses (-sēz)
Any of various abnormal conditions in which the physiological effect of a vitamin is produced to a pathological degree by excessive intake of the vitamin.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

hypervitaminosis

Any clinical condition caused by the ingestion of vitamins in extreme excess of physiologic requirements or pharmacologic doses. Hypervitaminosis is most commonly caused by excess consumption of fat-soluble vitamins, especially vitamins A and D (less commonly vitamins E and K), as they accumulate and remain stored in body fat; water-soluble vitamins B and C are readily excreted.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

hypervitaminosis

Popular nutrition A condition caused by the ingestion of vitamins in extreme excess of physiologic requirements, or pharmacologic doses; it most commonly is caused by excess consumption of fat-soluble vitamins–eg, vitamins A and D, as they accumulate in body fat; water-soluble vitamins B and C, are readily excreted. See Vitamins. Cf Pseudovitamins.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hy·per·vi·ta·min·o·sis

(hī'pĕr-vī'tă-mi-nō'sis)
A condition resulting from the ingestion of an excessive amount of a vitamin preparation, with symptoms varying according to the particular vitamin.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hypervitaminosis

One of a number of disorders that can result from excessive intake of certain vitamins, especially vitamins A and D. Overdosage with vitamin D can cause deposition of calcium in arteries and other tissues and kidney failure.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Hypervitaminosis

Another name for vitamin toxicity.
Mentioned in: Vitamin Toxicity
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

hy·per·vi·ta·min·o·sis

(hī'pĕr-vī'tă-mi-nō'sis)
Condition due to ingestion of excessive vitamin preparations; serious effects may be caused by overdosage with fat-soluble vitamins, especially A or D.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords and abbreviation:Vitamin D (VD) Vitamin D deficiency (VDD), Hypervitaminosis D, Vitamin D toxicity.
Micronutrient Effect on bone health Sodium Excessive intake is a risk factor for osteoporosis Phosphorus Chronic, greater than calcium intake potentially linked with bone loss Copper Deficiency linked with cartilage and bone disorders Zinc Incompetence during growth reduces peak bone density Magnesium Improves bone quality Manganese Involved in bone metabolism Vitamin K Low levels associated with reduced bone density and increased risk of fractures Vitamin C Increased intake linked with increased bone density Vitamin A Hypervitaminosis A causes bone resorption and decrease in bone formation Vitamin B12 Deficiency associated with reduced bone development and maintenance Table 4: Macronutrients and their effect on bone health.
High levels of carotenoids in the body does not cause hypervitaminosis A because conversion of the carotenoid beta carotene to vitamin A ceases when there is adequate stores in the body, thus preventing toxicity.
Hyperphosphatemia is caused by chronic renal failure, Addison's disease, hypervitaminosis D, cytotoxic treatment of certain leukemias, lymphomas, metastatic bone tumors, diabetic ketoacidosis, and healing bone fractures.
Hypervitaminosis and safe levels of vitamin A for larval flounder Paralichthys olivaceus fed Artemia nauplii.
There are various reports of spontaneous SDH in healthy young adults who had risk factors like hypertension, vascular malformations, neoplasia such as hematological malignancies causing thrombocytopaenia, solid tumour dural metastases, infection, hypervitaminosis, coagulopathy and alcoholism (4).
Suggested factors that predispose patients with ESRD to calciphylaxis are diabetes mellitus, peritoneal dialysis (PD), hypoalbuminemia associated with chronic inflammation, malnutrition, hypertension, atherosclerosis, hyperphosphatemia, hypercalcemic states (including secondary hyperparathyroidism), milk-alkali syndrome, hypervitaminosis D, and elevated calcium-phosphate product in the range of 60 to 70 (Beitz, 2003; Fader & Kang, 1996; Ketteler et al., 2007; Parker et al., 2003).
This can be dangerous as it can lead to complications like kidney damage." Another condition to be vary of is vitamin D toxicity known as hypervitaminosis D, said Dr Al Hammadi.
Vitamin D toxicity, also called hypervitaminosis D, is a rare but potentially serious condition that occurs when you have excessive amounts of vitamin D in your body.
In addition, there is, wisely, a word of caution associated with the discussion on nutritional supplementation, since 'hypervitaminosis toxicity' can occur with vitamin A, which can lead to raised intraocular pressure (IOP), headaches and even bone fractures in elderly patients.
Metabolic disorders, such as hypervitaminosis A, pseudohypoparathyroidism, and renal osteodystrophy, could be excluded based on their radiological appearance of periosteal new bone formation in diaphysis with sparing of the medullary cavity (hypervitaminosis A) and generalized osteosclerosis (pseudohypoparathyroidism, and renal osteodystrophy) along with laboratory abnormalities (i.e., hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia in pseudohypoparathyroidism).