hypervitaminosis


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Related to hypervitaminosis: hypervitaminosis E, Hypervitaminosis D, hypervitaminosis K

hypervitaminosis

 [hi″per-vi″tah-mĭ-no´sis]
a condition produced by ingestion of excessive amounts of vitamins; symptom complexes are associated with excessive intake of vitamins A and D (hypervitaminosis A and hypervitaminosis D).

hy·per·vi·ta·min·o·sis

(hī'pĕr-vī'tă-mi-nō'sis),
A condition resulting from the ingestion of an excessive amount of a vitamin preparation, symptoms varying according to the particular vitamin involved; serious effects may be caused by overdosage with fat-soluble vitamins, especially A or D, but more rarely with water-soluble vitamins.

hypervitaminosis

/hy·per·vi·ta·min·o·sis/ (-vi″tah-mĭ-no´sis) a condition due to ingestion of an excess of one or more vitamins; symptom complexes are associated with excessive intake of vitamins A and D.hypervitaminot´ic

hypervitaminosis

(hī′pər-vī′tə-mə-nō′sĭs)
n. pl. hypervitamino·ses (-sēz)
Any of various abnormal conditions in which the physiological effect of a vitamin is produced to a pathological degree by excessive intake of the vitamin.

hypervitaminosis

[-vī′təminō′sis]
an abnormal condition resulting from excessive intake of toxic amounts (self-prescribed, usually from supplements) of one or more vitamins, especially over a long period. Serious effects may result from overdoses of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, or K, but adverse reactions are less likely with the water-soluble B and C vitamins, except when taken in megadoses. Compare avitaminosis. See also megadose, specific vitamins.

hypervitaminosis

Any clinical condition caused by the ingestion of vitamins in extreme excess of physiologic requirements or pharmacologic doses. Hypervitaminosis is most commonly caused by excess consumption of fat-soluble vitamins, especially vitamins A and D (less commonly vitamins E and K), as they accumulate and remain stored in body fat; water-soluble vitamins B and C are readily excreted.

hypervitaminosis

Popular nutrition A condition caused by the ingestion of vitamins in extreme excess of physiologic requirements, or pharmacologic doses; it most commonly is caused by excess consumption of fat-soluble vitamins–eg, vitamins A and D, as they accumulate in body fat; water-soluble vitamins B and C, are readily excreted. See Vitamins. Cf Pseudovitamins.

hy·per·vi·ta·min·o·sis

(hī'pĕr-vī'tă-mi-nō'sis)
A condition resulting from the ingestion of an excessive amount of a vitamin preparation, with symptoms varying according to the particular vitamin.

hypervitaminosis

One of a number of disorders that can result from excessive intake of certain vitamins, especially vitamins A and D. Overdosage with vitamin D can cause deposition of calcium in arteries and other tissues and kidney failure.

Hypervitaminosis

Another name for vitamin toxicity.
Mentioned in: Vitamin Toxicity

hy·per·vi·ta·min·o·sis

(hī'pĕr-vī'tă-mi-nō'sis)
Condition due to ingestion of excessive vitamin preparations; serious effects may be caused by overdosage with fat-soluble vitamins, especially A or D.

hypervitaminosis

a condition produced by ingestion or injection of excessive amounts of vitamins; symptom complexes are associated with excessive intake of vitamins A and D.

hypervitaminosis A
occurs mainly in cats, and is caused by a long-term diet consisting almost entirely of liver. Affected cats show neck pain and stiffness caused by a deforming cervical spondylosis. Other joints may be similarly affected. There is also hyperesthesia, irritability, anorexia, weight loss, and sometimes neurological deficits. Premature loss of teeth has also been reported.
hypervitaminosis D
caused by overdosing with vitamin D preparations as in milk fever prophylaxis and inappropriate treatment of disorders of dietary calcium and phosphorus, by errors in a diet mix, and oversupplementation of small puppies and kittens. Causes dystrophic soft tissue calcification, particularly nephrocalcinosis with subsequent renal failure. See also enzootic calcinosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypervitaminosis and safe levels of vitamin A for larval flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) fed Artemia nauplii.
Hypervitaminosis A: A case report in an adolescent soccer player.
excessive amounts of these could lead to an overdose known as hypervitaminosis.
Early use of retinoids involved supra-physiological dosing with vitamin A, causing hypervitaminosis A syndrome.
The principal oral retinoid used to treat acne vulgaris is 13-cis RA (isotretinoin), but this produces relatively severe side-effects such as cheilitis, pruritus and epistaxis [9] related to hypervitaminosis A and it is teratogenic.
This approach is cost-effective and will eliminate the threat of hypervitaminosis and other side effects as well as drug interactions.
Vitamin D requirements during lactation: high dose maternal supplementation as therapy to prevent hypervitaminosis D for both mother and nursing infant.
Based on the relatively quick onset of pseudotumor cerebri following isotretinoin exposure, the limited number of documented positive rechallenges, and the fact that hypervitaminosis A is a known cause, the investigators concluded that "it seems certain" that there is a direct correlation between isotretinoin use and benign intracranial hypertension (Ophthalmology 2004;111:1248-50).
This could be due to many reasons such as excessive calcium intake for a long period of time, hypervitaminosis D (excess vitamin D) which causes an increased calcium absorption from the intestines as well as increased calcium withdrawal from the bones, a diet high in animal protein which leads to increased calcium excretions, as well as very sedentary lifestyle or immobilization due to an illness which leads to the withdrawal of bone calcium.