hypervitaminosis


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hypervitaminosis

 [hi″per-vi″tah-mĭ-no´sis]
a condition produced by ingestion of excessive amounts of vitamins; symptom complexes are associated with excessive intake of vitamins A and D (hypervitaminosis A and hypervitaminosis D).

hy·per·vi·ta·min·o·sis

(hī'pĕr-vī'tă-mi-nō'sis),
A condition resulting from the ingestion of an excessive amount of a vitamin preparation, symptoms varying according to the particular vitamin involved; serious effects may be caused by overdosage with fat-soluble vitamins, especially A or D, but more rarely with water-soluble vitamins.

hypervitaminosis

/hy·per·vi·ta·min·o·sis/ (-vi″tah-mĭ-no´sis) a condition due to ingestion of an excess of one or more vitamins; symptom complexes are associated with excessive intake of vitamins A and D.hypervitaminot´ic

hypervitaminosis

(hī′pər-vī′tə-mə-nō′sĭs)
n. pl. hypervitamino·ses (-sēz)
Any of various abnormal conditions in which the physiological effect of a vitamin is produced to a pathological degree by excessive intake of the vitamin.

hypervitaminosis

[-vī′təminō′sis]
an abnormal condition resulting from excessive intake of toxic amounts (self-prescribed, usually from supplements) of one or more vitamins, especially over a long period. Serious effects may result from overdoses of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, or K, but adverse reactions are less likely with the water-soluble B and C vitamins, except when taken in megadoses. Compare avitaminosis. See also megadose, specific vitamins.

hypervitaminosis

Any clinical condition caused by the ingestion of vitamins in extreme excess of physiologic requirements or pharmacologic doses. Hypervitaminosis is most commonly caused by excess consumption of fat-soluble vitamins, especially vitamins A and D (less commonly vitamins E and K), as they accumulate and remain stored in body fat; water-soluble vitamins B and C are readily excreted.

hypervitaminosis

Popular nutrition A condition caused by the ingestion of vitamins in extreme excess of physiologic requirements, or pharmacologic doses; it most commonly is caused by excess consumption of fat-soluble vitamins–eg, vitamins A and D, as they accumulate in body fat; water-soluble vitamins B and C, are readily excreted. See Vitamins. Cf Pseudovitamins.

hy·per·vi·ta·min·o·sis

(hī'pĕr-vī'tă-mi-nō'sis)
A condition resulting from the ingestion of an excessive amount of a vitamin preparation, with symptoms varying according to the particular vitamin.

hypervitaminosis

One of a number of disorders that can result from excessive intake of certain vitamins, especially vitamins A and D. Overdosage with vitamin D can cause deposition of calcium in arteries and other tissues and kidney failure.

Hypervitaminosis

Another name for vitamin toxicity.
Mentioned in: Vitamin Toxicity

hy·per·vi·ta·min·o·sis

(hī'pĕr-vī'tă-mi-nō'sis)
Condition due to ingestion of excessive vitamin preparations; serious effects may be caused by overdosage with fat-soluble vitamins, especially A or D.

hypervitaminosis

a condition produced by ingestion or injection of excessive amounts of vitamins; symptom complexes are associated with excessive intake of vitamins A and D.

hypervitaminosis A
occurs mainly in cats, and is caused by a long-term diet consisting almost entirely of liver. Affected cats show neck pain and stiffness caused by a deforming cervical spondylosis. Other joints may be similarly affected. There is also hyperesthesia, irritability, anorexia, weight loss, and sometimes neurological deficits. Premature loss of teeth has also been reported.
hypervitaminosis D
caused by overdosing with vitamin D preparations as in milk fever prophylaxis and inappropriate treatment of disorders of dietary calcium and phosphorus, by errors in a diet mix, and oversupplementation of small puppies and kittens. Causes dystrophic soft tissue calcification, particularly nephrocalcinosis with subsequent renal failure. See also enzootic calcinosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypervitaminosis A syndrome: a paradigm of retinoid side effects.
A light and electron microscopic study of the lymphomyeloid complex in hypervitaminosis A.
Intake of excess vitamin and calcium supplements can cause hypervitaminosis and hypercalcinosis -- both which cause skin and hair problems.
In case reports involving older children, hypervitaminosis D has been associated with urinary tract infections and one case report linked vitamin D intoxication in a 4-month-old to nephrocalcinosis without renal impairment.
Patients should not take vitamin A supplements or other retinoids while being treated with alitretinoin, to avoid the risk of hypervitaminosis A.
The risks of exposure to environmental toxins and hypervitaminosis with fish consumption are substantially reduced through purification processes used to develop selected concentrated fish oil supplements and prescription preparations.
Metastatic calcification may occur in patients with chronic renal failure, primary hyperparathyroidism, extensive bone malignancy, hypervitaminosis D, diffuse myelomatosis, and milk-alkali syndrome.
There is no danger of hypervitaminosis following extensive exposure to sun.
He is suffering from hypervitaminosis D, a potentially life-threatening condition that results in excessive calcium in the blood.
Vieth (1) notes that hypercalcemia due to hypervitaminosis D is always associated with serum 25(OH)D concentrations greater than 88 ng/mL (220 nmol/L), and Holick (6) stated, "Vitamin D intoxication does not occur until the circulating levels of 25(OH)D are over 125 ng/mL [312 nmol/L].
These reports and the lack of any reports of hypervitaminosis D suggest that the distributions of serum vitamin D in Australia and New Zealand are displaced from the ideal, exposing both populations to mild vitamin D deficiency and vulnerable groups to moderate deficiency
Vitamin toxicity--also known as hypervitaminosis or vitamin poisoning--is a condition in which a person develops symptoms as side effects from taking massive doses of vitamins.