hyperviscosity syndrome


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

hyperviscosity

 [hi″per-vis-kos´ĭ-te]
excessive viscosity, as of the blood.
hyperviscosity syndrome any of various syndromes associated with increased viscosity of the blood. One type is due to serum hyperviscosity and is characterized by spontaneous bleeding with neurologic and ocular disorders. Another type is characterized by polycythemia with retarded blood flow, organ congestion, reduced capillary perfusion, and increased cardiac effort. A third group includes conditions in which the deformability of erythrocytes is impaired, such as sickle cell anemia.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hy·per·vis·cos·i·ty syn·drome

a syndrome resulting from increased viscosity of the blood; an increase in serum proteins may be associated with bleeding from mucous membranes, retinopathy, and neurologic symptoms, and is sometimes seen in Waldenström macroglobulinemia and in multiple myeloma; an increased viscosity secondary to polycythemia may be associated with organ congestion and decreased capillary perfusion.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hyperviscosity syndrome

Lab medicine A clinical condition caused by an abnormal sluggishness of blood flow through peripheral vessels, especially with serum IgM levels > 3 g/dL, which may trigger oronasal bleeding, blurred vision, headache, dizziness, vertigo, ataxia, encephalopathy, or altered consciousness Funduscopic exam Venous dilatation, "sausage formation" hemorrhages, exudates; serum viscosity correlates poorly with clinical findings among Pts, but correlates well in the same Pt. See Waldenström's macroglobulinemia.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hy·per·vis·cos·i·ty syn·drome

(hīpĕr-vis-kosi-tē sindrōm)
Disorder due to increased viscosity of the blood; an increase in serum proteins may be associated with bleeding from mucous membranes, retinopathy, and neurologic symptoms, and is sometimes seen in Waldenström macroglobulinemia and in multiple myeloma.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Considering the previous literature, the group differences between the RVOs and non-RVOs were also found to be significant in these diseases, including obesity [22], diabetes [14,17,22], hypertension [14,17,22,23], hyperlipidemia [7,12,15,22], coronary artery disease [7,23], atrial fibrillation [7], chronic kidney disease [7, 14, 22], and hyperviscosity syndrome [22].
Hyperviscosity syndrome usually results in neurologic symptoms such as vision changes, headaches, vertigo, dizziness, dementia, or other changes in consciousness.
In people with hyperleukocytosis secondary to leukemia and other myeloproliferative neoplasias, neurologic signs, such as hearing loss, (33) vertigo, (8) ataxia, (9) headache, (9) nystagmus, (9) and other neurologic signs, have been described, secondary to hyperviscosity syndrome. (8,9,33) The many neoplastic cells in the bloodstream increases blood viscosity, hindering blood flow and leading to tissue hypoxia.
Hyperviscosity syndrome is a clinical diagnosis made on a combination of the symptoms discussed above in conjunction with a viscosity of 4 cp or greater as measured by a viscosimeter (normal viscosity is 1.4-1.8 cp).The management of HVS divided into four phases: Supportive therapy, plasma exchange, plasmapheresis, and specific chemotherapy for the underlying hematologic condition.
Patients with advanced disease consisting of bulky disease, profound cytopenias, constitutional symptoms, and hyperviscosity syndrome are typically treated with a regimen of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone.
A Patients with hyperviscosity syndrome have always been a challenge when it comes to laboratory testing.
Ocular symptoms in leukemia patients may be due to the direct effect of leukemic cells on ocular tissues or secondary to such disease-related complications as anemia, thrombocytopenia, and hyperviscosity syndrome (1).
Cryoglobulinemia (CG) may present with a hyperviscosity syndrome and/or small vessel vasculitis.
Partial exchange transfusion for polycthemia hyperviscosity syndrome. Am J Perinatol 2011;28(7): 557-64.
In COPD there are noted: updates in rheologic features of blood by a type of hyperviscosity syndrome leading to disorders of pulmonary and myocardial microcirculation; state of ventilation, hemodynamic and tissue hypoxia; formation of secondary arterial pulmonary hypertension that reinforces pressure on right section of the heart and, therefore, increases a need of myocardium in oxygen, restricts coronary fraction of cardiac output and aggravates myocardial ischemia of both ventricles that results in progression of cardio-pulmonary failure (Chuchalina, 2003).
Other complications include hyperviscosity syndrome caused by excessive amounts of protein production.
Patients may also present with lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hyperviscosity syndrome, cryoglobulinemia, peripheral neuropathy, cold agglutinin hemolysis, autoimmune thrombocytopenia, von Willebrand's disease and, in rare cases, amyloidosis.