hyperviscosity


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hyperviscosity

 [hi″per-vis-kos´ĭ-te]
excessive viscosity, as of the blood.
hyperviscosity syndrome any of various syndromes associated with increased viscosity of the blood. One type is due to serum hyperviscosity and is characterized by spontaneous bleeding with neurologic and ocular disorders. Another type is characterized by polycythemia with retarded blood flow, organ congestion, reduced capillary perfusion, and increased cardiac effort. A third group includes conditions in which the deformability of erythrocytes is impaired, such as sickle cell anemia.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Hyperviscosity

Thick, viscous blood, caused by the accumulation of large proteins, such as immunoglobulins, in the serum.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Diffusion-weighted and gradient echo magnetic resonance findings of hemichorea-hemiballismus associated with diabetic hyperglycemia: A hyperviscosity syndrome?
It is thought that hyperglycemia-induced decrease in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels (2), hyperviscosity, and vascular insufficiency lead to incomplete, transient dysfunction in the striatum and results in chorea (3).
The hyperviscosity induced by hyperglycemia then causes a disruption of the blood-brain barrier and a resulting transient ischemia of the vulnerable striatal neurons [3].
Other complications, common in MM, such as hyperviscosity, renal failure, and hypercalcemia can also cause CNS symptoms, most commonly disorientation and somnolence.
In this situation, the RVO and comparison groups were 1: 5 matched using the PS matching method [20] for age, gender, index year (the year of the index date in the RVOs and the enrollment date in the comparisons), use of antithrombotic drugs, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, chronic kidney disease, hyperviscosity syndrome, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), and glaucoma.
Hyperviscosity syndrome secondary to a myelomaassociated IgG(1) kappa paraprotein strongly reactive against the HIV-1 p24 gag antigen.
Guidelines also warn against the risks of adverse transfusion events in these patients, including iron overload, hemolysis, hyperviscosity, and most important for this discussion, the risk of alloimmunization to foreign RBC antigens.
Risk factors may include: advanced age, prolonged immobilisation, hypercoagulable conditions, history of venous or arterial thrombosis, use of estrogens, indwelling vascular catheters, hyperviscosity, and cardiovascular risk factors.
It reduces the hemoglobin S (HbS) rate, brings normal hemoglobin without increasing the hemoglobin rate where hyperviscosity is a risk, and decreases iron overload [2, 8].
Patti et al., "Increased plasma apolipoprotein levels and blood hyperviscosity in non-insulin-dependent diabetic patients: role of the occurrence of arterial hypertension," Acta Diabetologica Latina, vol.
Possible mechanisms include increased hyperviscosity due to dehydration, stasis, and decreased intracardiac blood flow [11-13].
Depending on the CML phase and biology, patients may have a profoundly elevated WBC at diagnosis, which can present as leukostasis, or hyperviscosity syndrome.