hyperviscosity


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hyperviscosity

 [hi″per-vis-kos´ĭ-te]
excessive viscosity, as of the blood.
hyperviscosity syndrome any of various syndromes associated with increased viscosity of the blood. One type is due to serum hyperviscosity and is characterized by spontaneous bleeding with neurologic and ocular disorders. Another type is characterized by polycythemia with retarded blood flow, organ congestion, reduced capillary perfusion, and increased cardiac effort. A third group includes conditions in which the deformability of erythrocytes is impaired, such as sickle cell anemia.

hyperviscosity

/hy·per·vis·cos·i·ty/ (-vis-kos´ĭ-te) excessive viscosity, as of the blood.

hyperviscosity

[-viskos′itē]
Etymology: Gk, hyper, excess; L, viscosus, sticky
extreme viscosity or thickness of fluid.

Hyperviscosity

Thick, viscous blood, caused by the accumulation of large proteins, such as immunoglobulins, in the serum.

hyperviscosity

excessive viscosity, as of the blood.

hyperviscosity syndrome
increased viscosity of the blood occurs with IgM and IgA myelomas because of the high levels of macroglobulins; causes increased resistance to blood, hypoxia, organ failure, retinal lesions, abnormalities in platelet function, coagulation defects and cardiac failure.
References in periodicals archive ?
4) Advanced age, systemic vascular disease, hyperviscosity, diabetes mellitus, dysthyroid ophthalmopathy, and 360[degrees] scleral buckling surgery due to retinal detachment are among the risk factors associated with this complication.
Seminal hyperviscosity is associated with poor outcome of in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer: a prospective study.
Hyperviscosity syndrome usually results in neurologic symptoms such as vision changes, headaches, vertigo, dizziness, dementia, or other changes in consciousness.
This indicated that blood stasis induced a hyperviscosity of blood and puerarin could reduce this induction, thereby decreasing the intrinsic resistance of blood flow and ameliorating tissue perfusion.
A hyperviscosity syndrome may also be seen in association with ovarian cancer which favours thrombosis and may accelerate tumour progression and metastasis.
Hyperviscosity syndrome usually is associated with Waldenstr?
Hyperviscosity on a blood viscosity panel may also have insulin resistance as an underlying etiology.
Predisposing risk factors associated with patient (assign score 1 unless otherwise noted) Clinical setting Inherited Acquired (score (score 3) 3) Age 40-60 years Factor V Lupus Leiden/ anticoagulant activated Age > 60 years protein C Antiphospholipid (score 2) resistance antibodies History DVT/PE Antithrombin Myeloproliferative (score 3) III deficiency disorders Pregnancy or Dysfibrinogenaemia Disorders of postpartum plasminogen and (< 1 month) plasmin activation Malignancy Homocysteinaemia Heparin (score 2) thrombocytopenia Varicose 20210A Hyperviscosity veins prothrombin syndromes mutation Inflammatory Homocysteinaemia bowel disease Obesity (> 20% ideal body weight) Combined oral contraceptive/HRT Total additional predisposing risk factors associated with patient: Step 3.
Optometrists should ask the GP to consider a full blood count, ESR, fasting glucose, lipid profile looking for diabetes and hyperviscosity.
136) EPO use has been associated with hyperviscosity, a thickening of the blood, and is rumored to have caused the sudden death of eighteen cyclists.
Evidence-based focused review of management of hyperviscosity syndrome.
9 Phlebotomy might be effective in improving hyperviscosity but its ability to prevent CVE is controversial.