hypertrophy


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hypertrophy

 [hi-per´tro-fe]
increase in volume of a tissue or organ produced entirely by enlargement of existing cells. See also hyperplasia and proliferation. adj., adj hypertro´phic.
asymmetrical septal hypertrophy
2. the term is sometimes limited to cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in which the hypertrophy is localized to the interventricular septum. See also hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.
benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) age-associated enlargement of the prostate resulting from proliferation of glandular and stromal elements, beginning generally in the fifth decade of life; it may cause urethral compression and obstruction. Called also benign prostatic hyperplasia and nodular hyperplasia of the prostate.
cardiac hypertrophy enlargement of myocardial cells and hyperplasia of nonmuscular cardiac components due to pressure and volume overload and sometimes to neurohumoral factors.
compensatory hypertrophy that which results from an increased workload due to some physical defect, such as in an organ where one part is defective, or in one kidney when the other is absent or nonfunctional.
functional hypertrophy hypertrophy of an organ or part caused by its increased activity.
ventricular hypertrophy hypertrophy of the myocardium of a ventricle, due to chronic pressure overload; it is manifest electrocardiographically by increased QRS complex voltage, frequently accompanied by repolarization changes.

hy·per·tro·phy

(hī-pĕr'trō-fē),
General increase in bulk of a part or organ, not due to tumor formation. Use of the term may be restricted to denote greater bulk through increase in size, but not in number, of cells or other individual tissue elements. Compare: hyperplasia.
Synonym(s): hypertrophia
[hyper- + G. trophē, nourishment]

hypertrophy

(hī-pûr′trə-fē)
n. pl. hypertro·phies
A nontumorous enlargement of an organ or a tissue as a result of an increase in the size rather than the number of constituent cells: muscle hypertrophy.
intr. & tr.v. hypertro·phied, hypertro·phying, hypertro·phies
To grow or cause to grow abnormally large.

hy′per·tro′phic (-trō′fĭk, -trŏf′ĭk) adj.

hy·per·tro·phy

(hī-pĕr'trŏ-fē)
General increase in bulk of a part or organ, due to increase in size, but not in number, of the individual tissue elements.
See also: hyperplasia
[hyper- + G. trophē, nourishment]

hypertrophy

An increase in the size of a tissue or organ caused by enlargement of the individual cells. Hypertrophy is usually a normal response to an increased demand as in the case of the increase in muscle bulk due to sustained hard exercise. Compare HYPERPLASIA.

hypertrophy

the excessive growth or development of an organ or tissue.

Hypertrophy

A technical term for enlargement, as in BPH (benign prostatic hypertrophy).

hy·per·tro·phy

(hī-pĕr'trŏ-fē)
General increase in bulk of a part or organ, not due to tumor formation.
[hyper- + G. trophē, nourishment]

Patient discussion about hypertrophy

Q. I have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and an ICD. Is it possible to get breast implants with an ICD? I have no further symptoms: I workout and run 6 days a week, in good shape and only 27 years old.

A. Some medical equipment can damage your ICD If you are visiting your doctor , tell him or her that you have an ICD BEFORE they do any testing or treatment.i'm pretty sure they'll find a creative way to do the implant.any way- before doing any procedure- ask the cardiologist that handles you about it.

Q. When should the tonsils and/or adenoids should be removed?

A. Currently the tonsillectomy is recommended in the presence of 6 episodes of throat infection (Group A strep pharyngitis) in one year or 3-4 episodes in each of 2years. Adenoidectomy may be recommended when tympanostomy tube surgery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tympanostomy_tube) failed to prevent ear infection.

Another thing to consider is the presence of oral breathing - the constant use of the mouth for breathing in small children may lead to malformation of the facial bones that would necessitate more extensive surgeries later in life.

More discussions about hypertrophy
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with LV hypertrophy are closely monitored to ensure that heart failure does not develop or worsen.
The increase in concentration of NT-proBNP2 and uric acid4 shows a positive co-relationship with left ventricular hypertrophy due to aortic valve dysfunction.
Portal vein ligation combined with in situ splitting has been used to obtain rapid and adequate liver hypertrophy. This new approach could increase the number of curative resections in patients with locally advanced and primary or metastatic liver tumors.
In the present study, there were differences in hypertrophy between the aerobic and anaerobic training groups, with the groups submitted to resistance training presenting greater muscular hypertrophy.
In the present study, we aimed to investigate the function of miR-24 in cardiac hypertrophy by establishing a transverse aortic constriction (TAC) rat model, and miR-24 overexpressing in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes (NRCMs).
Conclusion: Caffeine intake altered the height of proliferative and hypertrophy zones of the epiphyseal cartilage of developing femur; however treatment with vitamin D3 ameliorated this effect.
Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death globally, resulting in about 30% of the deaths annually.1 Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is a strong predictor of cardiovascular mortality.
Conclusion: Adenoid hypertrophy is prevalent in adults and is an important cause of nasal obstruction.
The results showed that NVC (73%) was as common as septal deviation (80%) and inferior turbinate hypertrophy (77%) in patients with severe/extreme nasal obstruction.
Myocardial ischaemia, valvular heart disease, cardiomyopathy and eccentric hypertrophy and bundle branch block, evidence of MI and arrhythmias on ECG.
Taken together, these results highlight the biocompatibility, suitability and ease of using keratin coated surfaces for neonatal murine cardiomyocyte culture to study cardiac hypertrophy in vitro (6) and also the emphasize the importance of topography in assessing cardiac function.