hypertrophic pyloric stenosis


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hy·per·tro·phic py·lor·ic ste·no·sis

muscular hypertrophy of the pyloric sphincter, associated with projectile vomiting appearing during the first few weeks after birth, more commonly seen in boys.

hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

Pediatrics A condition affecting neonates, primarily boys, in the 1st few wks after hatching Pathogenesis Defect in pyloric relaxation and pylorospasm Clinical Gastric outlet obstruction, projectile bile-free vomiting, metabolic alkalosis, dehydration

hy·per·tro·phic py·lor·ic ste·no·sis

(hī'pĕr-trō'fik pī-lōr'ik stĕ-nō'sis)
Muscular hypertrophy of the pyloric sphincter, associated with projectile vomiting beginning in the second or third week of life, usually in males.
Synonym(s): congenital pyloric stenosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The preferred diagnostic approach for suspected Infantile Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis (IHPS) is a debatable topic, with different investigators discussing the cost-effectiveness and merits of available radiological investigations14.
Increased insulin-like growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor system in the pyloric muscle in infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. J Pediatr Surg 1998; 33:378-381
Postoperative ad lib feedings for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Journal of Pediatric Surgery, 34, 959-961.
An analysis of feeding regimens after pyloromyotomy for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Journal of Pediatric Surgery 28, 1478-1480.
Smooth muscle cell hypertrophy versus hyperplasia in infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Pediatr Res.
Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis after pertussis prophylaxis with erythromycin: a case review and cohort study.
The epidemiology of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a Danish population, 1950--84.
Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis related to ingestion of erythromycin estolate: a report of five cases.
Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis occurs more often in boys then in a girls, and is rare in children older than 6 months (3).
If the abdominal radiograph is nonspecific, high obstruction or gastroesophageal reflux could still explain the symptom profile, making a UGI in order--with the caveat that ultrasound is a more specific test for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.
Electron microscopic observation in infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS).
The big problem is, erythromycin does confer a small but very real increased risk of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. "It is a risk, and you need to counsel the parents," she said.

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