hypertonia


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hypertonia

 [hi″per-to´ne-ah]
abnormally increased tonicity, as of skeletal muscles or the walls of arteries.

hy·per·to·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-tō'nē-ă),
Extreme tension of the muscles or arteries.
Synonym(s): hypertonicity (1)
[hyper- + G. tonos, tension]

hypertonia

/hy·per·to·nia/ (-to´ne-ah) a condition of excessive tone of the skeletal muscles; increased resistance of muscle to passive stretching.

hypertonia

(hī′pər-tō′nē-ə)
n. Physiology
The state of being hypertonic.

hypertonia

[-tō′nē·ə]
1 abnormally increased muscle tone or strength. The condition is sometimes associated with genetic disorders, such as trisomy 18, and may be expressed in arm or leg deformities.
2 a condition of excessive pressure, such as the intraocular pressure of glaucoma.

hy·per·to·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-tō'nē-ă)
Extreme tension of the ocular muscles or arteries as seen in glaucoma.
[hyper- + G. tonos, tension]

hypertonia

Increased muscle tension (tone).

Hypertonia

Having excessive muscular tone.
Mentioned in: Adrenoleukodystrophy

hypertonia

increased muscle tension

hy·per·to·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-tō'nē-ă)
Extreme tension of the muscles or arteries.
[hyper- + G. tonos, tension]

hypertonia

abnormally increased tonicity or strength.

hypertonia oculi
high intraocular pressure; glaucoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Symptoms that occurred in at least two more paliperidone patients than placebo patients included hypertonia, drooling, akathisia, muscle spasms, dystonia, dyskinesia, and tremor.
Hyperekplexia must be differentiated from other causes of neonatal hypertonia such as tetany, spastic cerebral palsy, Schwartz-Jample syndrome, severe perinatal asphyxia and spastic quadriparesis (5).
Physical impairment can be exhibited as hypotonia or hypertonia.
The spasticity was refractory to the standard regimens used for spastic hypertonia.
REHAB] Update on Physical Therapy for Children with Hypertonia and Hypotonia: Focus on Equipment
For example, unlike other drug-exposed newborns, very few withdrawal symptoms have been reported for cocaine-exposed neonates, although some have reported tremulousness, irritability, wakefulness/restlessness, hypertonia, and abnormal reflexes (Livesay, Ehrlick, & Finnegan, 1987; Rosecan & Gross, 1986), highlighting the importance of observing sleep patterns and reflex behaviors.
Other common adverse events may include hypoventilation, hypertonia, paresthesia, increased salivation, back pain, pruritus, diarrhea, peripheral edema, asthenia, pain, confusion, speech disorder, amblyopia, accidental injury and dry mouth.
Other adverse reactions reported with morphine sulfate extended-release tablets include amenorrhea, asthenia, bronchospasm, confusional state, drug hypersensitivity, fatigue, hyperalgesia, hypertonia, ileus, increased hepatic enzymes, intestinal obstruction, lethargy, malaise, pulmonary edema, thinking disturbances, somnolence, and vertigo.
The most common AEs associated with glatiramer acetate treatment include injection site reactions, vasodilatation, chest pain, asthenia, infection, pain, nausea, arthralgia, anxiety, and hypertonia (Copaxone, 2007).
Nervous System - Frequent Anxiety, Oepersonalization, Hypertonia, Hypesthesia, Libido decreased, Nystagmus, Paresthesia, Sedation, Stupor, Twitching.