hyperthymic

hy·per·thy·mic

(hī'pĕr-thī'mik),
1. Pertaining to hyperthymia.
2. Pertaining to hyperthymism.

hyperthymic

Immunology
Referring to increased thymic activity.

Psychology
Referring to excessive emotions.

hy·per·thy·mic

(hī'pĕr-thī'mik)
1. Pertaining to hyperthymia.
2. Pertaining to hyperthymism.
References in periodicals archive ?
When other temperament types were examined, no cyclothymic or hyperthymic dominant temperament was present in the patient group.
Two years after admission, the defendant met a female in the hospital who was also hospitalized with the diagnosis of "hyperthymic psychosyndromes with dissociative elements to a discordant personality".
If no items from criterion C are present, six of the following nine criteria are needed: 1) hyperthymic personality (at baseline, nondepressed state); 2) recurrent major depressive episode (>3); 3) brief major depressive episodes (on average, <3 months); 4) atypical depressive features (increased sleep or appetite); 5) psychotic major depressive episode; 6) early age at onset of major depressive episode (before age 25); 7) postpartum depression; 8) antidepressant tolerance ("wearoff," acute but not prophylactic response); 9) lack of response to >3 antidepressant treatment trials (Ghaemi, Hsu et al.
Other potential contributing factors are premorbid hyperthymic temperament, a possible propensity to psychotic thinking under stress, the sudden death of his wife, acute grief, the potentiating role of Cannabis, dehydration, and general malnutrition.
When the scores of mothers and fathers were compared separately, mothers had higher scores in all temperaments except hyperthymic temperament, and fathers had higher scores in all temperaments except anxious temperament in the ADHD group.
Those with a hyperthymic temperament, a tendency to be excessively positive, was significantly higher among those born in the spring and summer.
Among the surveyed patients of the first main group (arterial hypertension, AH) the following types of character accentuations were dominant: emotive (69.52 6 4.2%), anxiety (49.38 6 4.8%), demonstrative (37.46 6 5.1%), getting stuck (59.85 6 4.8%), hyperthymic (29.33 6 4.7%).
Cyclothymic, hyperthymic and depressive temperaments as subaffective variants of mood disorders.
While lesser known, the author offers that hyperthymic (high extroversion, sociability, and energy) personality disorder is also characteristic of successful crisis leaders.
Both of them were described as ebullient, clever, extroverted, and frequently manic in a restrained way--what psychiatrists call a "hyperthymic personality." But Ghaemi's fawning portrait of FDR exposes the author's bias toward historical narrative centered around great men.
However, that study allowed subjects with cyclothymic or hyperthymic affective temperament to be labeled as BPDII, whereas we here used a narrower definition.
In one of the more elaborate models, Akiskal and Pinto (1999) described a bipolar spectrum that incorporates seven subtypes: bipolar I (classic mania); bipolar I 1/2 (depression with persistent hypomania); bipolar II (depression interspersed with hypomania); bipolar II 1/2 (depression with briefer periods of hypomania); bipolar III (antidepressant-induced hypomania); bipolar III 1/2 (bipolarity associated with substance misuse); and bipolar IV (depression superimposed on a hyperthymic temperament).