hyperthermia


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hyperthermia

 [hi″per-ther´me-ah]
1. greatly increased temperature; see also fever. Called also hyperpyrexia. adj., adj hyperther´mal, hyperther´mic.
2. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the state in which an individual's body temperature is elevated above his or her normal range.
malignant hyperthermia a syndrome affecting patients undergoing general anesthesia, marked by rapid rise in body temperature, signs of increased muscle metabolism, and usually rigidity. The sensitivity is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.

hy·per·ther·mi·a

(hī-per-ther'mē-ă),
Therapeutically or iatrogenically induced hyperpyrexia.
[hyper- + G. thermē, heat]

hyperthermia

/hy·per·ther·mia/ (-ther´me-ah) hyperpyrexia; greatly increased body temperature.hyperther´malhyperther´mic
malignant hyperthermia  an autosomal dominant inherited condition affecting patients undergoing general anesthesia, marked by sudden, rapid rise in body temperature, associated with signs of increased muscle metabolism, and, usually, muscle rigidity.

hyperthermia

(hī′pər-thûr′mē-ə)
n.
Unusually high body temperature.

hy′per·ther′mal adj.

hyperthermia

[hī′pərthur′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, hyper + therme, heat
1 a much higher than normal body temperature induced therapeutically or iatrogenically.
2
Usage notes: nontechnical.
malignant hyperthermia.
3 the use of various heating methods, such as electromagnetic therapy, to produce temperature elevations of a few degrees in cells and tissues. It is believed to lead to an antitumor effect. Hyperthermia may be used in conjunction with radiotherapy or chemotherapy for cancer treatment.

hyperthermia

Hyperpyrexia Mainstream medicine A condition defined as a corporal temperature of ≥ 42ºC; the body defends itself with peripheral vasodilation–↓ effective volume, resulting in ↑ pulse rate–a response to perceived blood loss, ↓ cardiac efficiency, hypoxia, ↑ permeability of cell membranes with ↑ potassium, followed by cardiac failure. See Malignant hyperthermia Oncology A type of treatment in which tissue is exposed to high temperatures to damage and kill CA cells, or ↑ CA cell sensitivity to RT and chemotherapy. See Induced hyperthermia, Malignant hyperthermia.

hy·per·ther·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-thĕr'mē-ă, hīpĕr-thĕrmē-ă)
Hyperpyrexia, often (but not necessarily) induced therapeutically; denotes bodily state with core body temperature significantly above 98.6°F (37°C); term may indicate temperature sufficiently elevated to cause illness.
[hyper- + G. thermē, heat]

hyperthermia

See HYPERPYREXIA, MALIGNANT HYPERTHERMIA.

hyperthermia,

n See therapy, heat.

hy·per·ther·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-thĕr'mē-ă)
Therapeutically or iatrogenically induced hyperpyrexia.
[hyper- + G. thermē, heat]

hyperthermia

1. greatly increased body temperature. May have effect as teratogen.
2. heat therapy. Used in the treatment of tumors, often in conjunction with chemotherapy or radiation. Whole body, regional or localized hyperthermia is induced with electromagnetic radiation, radiofrequency current heating or ultrasonic heating.

epidemic hyperthermia
poisoning by Neotyphodium (Acremonium)coenophialum.
idiopathic hyperthermia
term applied in error to the effects of ergotism under conditions of high ambient temperature. See also rye ergot, Neotyphodium(Acremonium) coenophialum.
malignant hyperthermia
a drug induced stress syndrome of pigs which have been treated with halothane or suxamethonium. Isolated cases have been reported in dogs and cats. The clinical syndrome includes muscle rigidity and hyperthermia. It is fatal and susceptibility to it is inherited. See also porcine stress syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
These were also given throughout the days leading up to the second hyperthermia treatment.
Recognizing and managing a malignant hyperthermia crisis: Guidelines from the European Malignant Hyperthermia Group.
Combining hyperthermia and other treatment strategies
With hyperthermia a selective temperature increase from 41[degrees] to 45[degrees]C is applied to the tumor area [9,10].
Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is an inherited autosomal life threatening skeletal muscle disorder usually triggered by certain drugs of general anesthesia like volatile anesthetics and depolarizing muscle relaxants (succinylcholine)1.
The risk for hyperthermia may increase from age-related changes to the skin such as poor blood circulation and inefficient sweat glands; alcohol use; being substantially under- or overweight; dehydration; heart, lung, and kidney diseases as well as any illness that causes general weakness or fever; high blood pressure or other health conditions that require changes in diet; reduced perspiration, caused by medications such as diuretics, sedatives, tranquilizers, and certain heart and blood pressure drugs; and use of multiple medications.
Ryanodex (dantrolene sodium) is a novel formulation of the antidote for management of malignant hyperthermia (MH) and now provides a therapeutic loading dose of dantrolene sodium in a single vial.
Hippocrates (479-377) The use of elevated temperature, hyperthermia (HT) is not a new treatment for cancer.
In this study, we tried to investigate and compare the effects of endogenous versus exogenous hyperthermia on brain through animal experiment model.
Suspect malignant hyperthermia (MH) if a patient has night sweats, cramping, mottled skin, low-grade fever, and excessive sweating, or has elevated creatine kinase and rhabdomyolysis on lab studies.

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