hyperthermia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hyperthermia

 [hi″per-ther´me-ah]
1. greatly increased temperature; see also fever. Called also hyperpyrexia. adj., adj hyperther´mal, hyperther´mic.
2. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the state in which an individual's body temperature is elevated above his or her normal range.
malignant hyperthermia a syndrome affecting patients undergoing general anesthesia, marked by rapid rise in body temperature, signs of increased muscle metabolism, and usually rigidity. The sensitivity is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.

hy·per·ther·mi·a

(hī-per-ther'mē-ă),
Therapeutically or iatrogenically induced hyperpyrexia.
[hyper- + G. thermē, heat]

hyperthermia

(hī′pər-thûr′mē-ə)
n.
Unusually high body temperature.

hy′per·ther′mal adj.

hyperthermia

Hyperpyrexia Mainstream medicine A condition defined as a corporal temperature of ≥ 42ºC; the body defends itself with peripheral vasodilation–↓ effective volume, resulting in ↑ pulse rate–a response to perceived blood loss, ↓ cardiac efficiency, hypoxia, ↑ permeability of cell membranes with ↑ potassium, followed by cardiac failure. See Malignant hyperthermia Oncology A type of treatment in which tissue is exposed to high temperatures to damage and kill CA cells, or ↑ CA cell sensitivity to RT and chemotherapy. See Induced hyperthermia, Malignant hyperthermia.

hy·per·ther·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-thĕr'mē-ă, hīpĕr-thĕrmē-ă)
Hyperpyrexia, often (but not necessarily) induced therapeutically; denotes bodily state with core body temperature significantly above 98.6°F (37°C); term may indicate temperature sufficiently elevated to cause illness.
[hyper- + G. thermē, heat]

hyperthermia

See HYPERPYREXIA, MALIGNANT HYPERTHERMIA.

hy·per·ther·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-thĕr'mē-ă)
Therapeutically or iatrogenically induced hyperpyrexia.
[hyper- + G. thermē, heat]
References in periodicals archive ?
National databases are used in many countries to capture information on malignant hyperthermia and are then utilised to inform clinicians.
Doctors of ancient Greece started using this therapeutic approach and named it 'overheating' (in Greek: hyperthermia).
Pending confirmation, the patient's medical record mentions suspicion of MH susceptibility and treatment with dantrolene for malignant hyperthermia. This information will remain in the patient's permanent medical record and could be viewed as a preexisting condition.
However, it is noteworthy that these temperature values are reached quickly and enough high (>42[degrees]C) to cause damage or cell death with minimal damage to healthy tissues, as it has been reported previously for hyperthermia treatment [23-25].
Hyperthermia induces an increase in splanchnic and renal sympathetic nervous activity [1, 2], resulting in vasoconstriction of the respective vascular beds.
He was started on bromocriptine in addition to the antipyretics and cooling wraps for treatment of his central hyperthermia. The fever spikes reduced to minor fluctuations that worsened with each attempt to wean off the bromocriptine (Figure 2).
The thermal sensor circuit for temperature-controlled laser hyperthermia worked well in the case using thermography.
In this work, we propose a multichannel wideband EM hyperthermia system to focus energy and devise a genetic algorithm (GA) as a heuristic optimization technique to enhance SAR accumulation.
Malignant hyperthermia is a rare genetic condition that could be triggered under general anaesthesia, said Dr Ali Reza Eghtedari, Consultant General Surgeon, Medeor 24/7 Hospital Dubai.
One of the potential therapies is local hyperthermia with MNPs.

Full browser ?