hyperthermia

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Related to hyperthermal: hypothermal, Hyperthermia therapy

hyperthermia

 [hi″per-ther´me-ah]
1. greatly increased temperature; see also fever. Called also hyperpyrexia. adj., adj hyperther´mal, hyperther´mic.
2. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the state in which an individual's body temperature is elevated above his or her normal range.
malignant hyperthermia a syndrome affecting patients undergoing general anesthesia, marked by rapid rise in body temperature, signs of increased muscle metabolism, and usually rigidity. The sensitivity is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.

hy·per·ther·mi·a

(hī-per-ther'mē-ă),
Therapeutically or iatrogenically induced hyperpyrexia.
[hyper- + G. thermē, heat]

hyperthermia

/hy·per·ther·mia/ (-ther´me-ah) hyperpyrexia; greatly increased body temperature.hyperther´malhyperther´mic
malignant hyperthermia  an autosomal dominant inherited condition affecting patients undergoing general anesthesia, marked by sudden, rapid rise in body temperature, associated with signs of increased muscle metabolism, and, usually, muscle rigidity.

hyperthermia

(hī′pər-thûr′mē-ə)
n.
Unusually high body temperature.

hy′per·ther′mal adj.

hyperthermia

[hī′pərthur′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, hyper + therme, heat
1 a much higher than normal body temperature induced therapeutically or iatrogenically.
2
Usage notes: nontechnical.
malignant hyperthermia.
3 the use of various heating methods, such as electromagnetic therapy, to produce temperature elevations of a few degrees in cells and tissues. It is believed to lead to an antitumor effect. Hyperthermia may be used in conjunction with radiotherapy or chemotherapy for cancer treatment.

hyperthermia

Hyperpyrexia Mainstream medicine A condition defined as a corporal temperature of ≥ 42ºC; the body defends itself with peripheral vasodilation–↓ effective volume, resulting in ↑ pulse rate–a response to perceived blood loss, ↓ cardiac efficiency, hypoxia, ↑ permeability of cell membranes with ↑ potassium, followed by cardiac failure. See Malignant hyperthermia Oncology A type of treatment in which tissue is exposed to high temperatures to damage and kill CA cells, or ↑ CA cell sensitivity to RT and chemotherapy. See Induced hyperthermia, Malignant hyperthermia.

hy·per·ther·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-thĕr'mē-ă, hīpĕr-thĕrmē-ă)
Hyperpyrexia, often (but not necessarily) induced therapeutically; denotes bodily state with core body temperature significantly above 98.6°F (37°C); term may indicate temperature sufficiently elevated to cause illness.
[hyper- + G. thermē, heat]

hyperthermia

See HYPERPYREXIA, MALIGNANT HYPERTHERMIA.

hyperthermia,

n See therapy, heat.

hy·per·ther·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-thĕr'mē-ă)
Therapeutically or iatrogenically induced hyperpyrexia.
[hyper- + G. thermē, heat]

hyperthermia

1. greatly increased body temperature. May have effect as teratogen.
2. heat therapy. Used in the treatment of tumors, often in conjunction with chemotherapy or radiation. Whole body, regional or localized hyperthermia is induced with electromagnetic radiation, radiofrequency current heating or ultrasonic heating.

epidemic hyperthermia
poisoning by Neotyphodium (Acremonium)coenophialum.
idiopathic hyperthermia
term applied in error to the effects of ergotism under conditions of high ambient temperature. See also rye ergot, Neotyphodium(Acremonium) coenophialum.
malignant hyperthermia
a drug induced stress syndrome of pigs which have been treated with halothane or suxamethonium. Isolated cases have been reported in dogs and cats. The clinical syndrome includes muscle rigidity and hyperthermia. It is fatal and susceptibility to it is inherited. See also porcine stress syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our patient, the syndrome began about 16 hours after hyperthermal balneotherapy; hence, it is logical to conclude that this type of therapy might be a risk factor for PFMS.
As was the case with our patient, long-duration travel and hyperthermal balneotherapy are possible environmental triggers for PFMS patients with the V726A mutation.
Although documentation of these phases is, as yet, relatively incomplete, the available information indicates that these hyperthermals are also associated with massive injection of [sup.
The past years of research on the PETM and the newly discovered additional hyperthermals have resulted in a clearer picture of these critical phases in Earth's history.
The most documented 'PETM', smaller hyperthermals are also reported from the early Eocene deposits worldwide e.
The time span and depositional depth suggests that the Panoba Formation offers potential sedimentary material for paleoclimatological research on the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) or post PETM scenario and on the early Eocene short hyperthermals e.
Team member Will Clyde said the parallels between ancient hyperthermals and modern climate change made studies of fossil records extremely valuable.
The hyperthermals took place roughly every 400,000 years during a warm period of Earth's history that prevailed some 50 million years ago and lasted about 40,000 years before temperatures returned to normal.
The majority of these hyperthermals increased average global temperatures by 3.
These hyperthermals seem not to have been rare events.

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