hypertext


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hypertext

A link—typically displayed as (blue) coloured, underlined text—incorporated in an electronic document that permits internet browsers to immediately open another document in the same or another website.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Written using the Storyspace software program, hypertext fiction comprises links and lexias, the hypertextual equivalent of pages in a printed book (see Fig.
A hypertext rewriting of Frankenstein, Jackson's Patchwork Girl has drawn critical attention to the newer medium's potential to articulate postmodern subjectivity as fragmented, distributed, and networked.
In order to explore the relation of metacognitive strategy use and hypertext comprehension, considerable attention has been paid to understanding what proficient EFL readers typically do while reading hypertexts, including identifying the types of strategies and determining how they use them as well as under what conditions they are used (Anderson, 2003; Genc, 2011).
The associative function of hyperlinks is well documented in first-wave hypertext theory (e.g.
This volume provides a sophisticated and vital history of early computing, usefully exploring conceptual ideas around hypertext, outlining the constraints on pioneering efforts to implement models of hypertext as technical prototypes, and ultimately demonstrating how these collectively shaped all subsequent efforts to develop computer-based prototypes for information structuring and retrieval.
Shelley Jackson is the author of a seminal CD ROM project called Patchwork Girl, one of the first interactive narratives to use Storyspace and incorporate hypertext and hypermedia.
As noted, some researchers believe that hypertext technology provides "potential for a greater and richer" learning environment (Dillon, 1996, p.
As a hypertext, Text 1 also comprised an introductory paragraph, which was designed to be located on the first page of a computer screen; it also contained 911 words and nine nodes corresponding to the same nine subtitles mentioned above.
Protopsaltis and Bouki (2005) developed a model for describing the process of reading articles in a hypertext format.
For critics such as Marie-Laure Ryan, now that the hype about hypertext fiction has died down, we are left with the sobering fact that outside of university departments and a fairly small group of writers/theorists, these fictions are not widely read or talked about.
Researchers and teachers pursuing a constructivist view of learning favor hypertext as a learning medium.