hyperreactive


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hyperreactive

 [hi″per-re-ak´tiv]
showing a greater than normal response to stimuli.

hyperreactive

/hy·per·re·ac·tive/ (-re-ak´tiv) showing a greater than normal response to stimuli.

hyperreactive

(hī″pĕr-rē-ăk′tĭv)
Pert. to an increased response to stimuli.

hyperreactive

showing a greater than normal response to stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
An increasingly publicized problem for those with hyperreactive airways is sensitivity to sulfite preservatives, with resulting bronchospasm.
Recent studies of hyperreactive malarious splenomegaly (tropical splenomegaly syndrome) in Papua New Guinea.
This hyperreactive congestion control causes end-to-end throughput degradation.
Direct evidence for the existence and functional role of hyperreactive sulfhydryls on the ryanodine receptor--triadin complex selectively labeled by the coumarin maleimide 7-diethylamino-3-(4'-maleimidylpheny1)-4-methylcoumarin.
Iowa Fire Equipment, (40) a plaintiff sought review of a district court opinion excluding his expert's opinion that exposure to discharge from a fire extinguisher caused a hyperreactive airway disorder.
While Gulack survived 9/11 without injury, he suffers from hyperreactive lungs as a result of his exposure to small particulates and other contaminants at his job site when he went back to work in October 2011.
It merits proposing that hyperreactive individuals are more likely to exhaust their network with demands and expectations.
For example, the more pervasive and chronic the maltreatment environment, the more likely it is that the child's trauma-organizing responses will become generalized hyperreactive and hypersensitive to a broad range of stress-inducing cues beyond the original traumatic event or events (Perry, 2006).
There are 3 important factors that predispose patients to plaque rupture or recurrent events: plaque burden or multiple arterial plaques, the presence of persistent hyperreactive platelets, and ongoing vascular arterial inflammation.
It has been suggested that abusive behaviors may be learned from parents, that adults who were abused as children may be hyperreactive to stressful situations, and that these individuals may not have developed appropriate coping and problem-solving skills (Belsky, 1993).
Object relations in borderline patients may be affected by a hyperreactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a hyperactive amygdala, smaller prefrontal cortices, impaired regulation of the amygdala, and hippocampal abnormalities, he said at the annual meeting of the American College of Psychiatrists.