hyperphosphatasemia

hyperphosphatasemia

 [hi″per-fos″fah-ta-se´me-ah]
high levels of alkaline phosphatase in the blood; see hyperphosphatasia.

hy·per·phos·pha·ta·se·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-fos'fă-tă-sē'mē-ă),
Abnormally high content of alkaline phosphatase in the circulating blood.
See also: hyperphosphatasia.

hy·per·phos·pha·ta·se·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-fos'fă-tă-sē'mē-ă)
Abnormally high alkaline phosphatase in circulating blood.
Synonym(s): hyperphosphataemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some Siberian Huskies have benign (and transient) familial hyperphosphatasemia. Dogs with bone cancer, some liver cancers, and mammary tumors may have elevations of this enzyme on blood screenings.
This condition with unclear etiology, which is called benign transient hyperphosphatasemia (BTH) and is mostly observed following a viral diarrhea or respiratory tract infection, is a biochemical problem rather than being an illness (2).
The parents' Ca, P and ALP levels, which were measured to exclude familial hyperphosphatasemia were found as normal (Table 1).
Physicians look for hyperphosphatasemia to detect and follow skeletal or hepatobiliary disease, but hypophosphatasemia, although it is a consequence of many disorders, frequently remains uninvestigated (2).
Incidence and characteristics of intestinal hyperphosphatasemia in healthy subjects.RinshoByori.
Benign familial hyperphosphatasemia presents in a similar manner and could be distinguished from macro-ALP by an autosomal dominant family history and the presence of intestinal ALP on isoenzyme electrophoresis (5).
The final diagnoses were transient hyperphosphatasemia of infancy (THI) and hypercarotenemia (3-5).
An isolated increase of ALP (>1000 U/L) is consistent with transient hyperphosphatasemia, a benign condition presenting before age 5 years (peak age 6 -24 months) (1), with a prevalence of 1.5%-2.8% (1, 2).
Isoenzyme studies in transient hyperphosphatasemia of infancy.
Transient hyperphosphatasemia of infancy and childhood (TH) is a temporary and isolated increase of serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP; EC 3.1.3.1) activity occurring without obvious cause during the first years of life.
The hyperphosphatasemia was discovered fortuitously during routine investigations in outpatient and inpatient departments of a children's hospital with a capacity of 500 beds.