hyperoxemia


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hyperoxemia

 [hi″per-ok-se´me-ah]
excessive acidity of the blood.

hyperoxemia

(hī″pĕr-ŏk-sē′mē-ă) [″ + oxys, sharp, + haima, blood]
Increased oxygen content of the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reinikainen et al., "Hyperoxemia and long-term outcome after traumatic brain injury," Critical Care, vol.
Skrifvars et al., "Early moderate hyperoxemia does not predict outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage," Neurosurgery, vol.
In the evaluation of hyperoxemia (Pa[O.sub.2]>80), from 193 ABG specimens, 61 had Pa[O.sub.2] higher than 80 (hyperoxemia).
assessed the validity of pulse oximetry in the estimation of hypoxemia and hyperoxemia in neonates and children.
In our study, the diagnostic value of pulse oximetry in the detection of hyperoxemia was high.
Pulse oximetry in the detection of hyperoxemia in neonates <1500 grams with RDS, who are treated according to INSURE protocol, has a good validity to appropriately manage the patient without blood gas analysis.
(78) The UH is, therefore, a maternal, hypoxemia-induced, focal-adaptive villous change, whereas PU is associated with intervillous hyperoxemia. The patterns may predispose a patient toward a greater vulnerability for superimposed, acute hypoxic lesions (overlap patterns/lesions, see below) or may sometimes protect against acute hypoxia in labor because PR can be an adaptive placental response and, in fact, protect the fetus against birth-related hypoxia.
Extreme whole body hyperthermia using the infrared-A technique IRATHERM 2000-selective thermosensitisation by hyperglycemia--circulatory back up by adapted hyperoxemia. Strahlenther Onkol.
Pulse oximetry Transcutaneous [O.sub.2] Accuracy Excellent (vs Good (vs [S.sub.a][O.sub.2]) [P.sub.a][O.sub.2]) Hypoxemia detection Excellent Good Calibration required No Yes Ease to use Very easy Moderately difficult Limitations Hypotension Hypotension Poor perfusion Poor perfusion Motion Edema Skin disorders Complications Rare Burns Hyperoxemia detection Good Excellent Table 4.
(19) In preuterine and uterine placental hypoxia, oxygen is decreased in the intervillous space, whereas in postuterine hypoxia, there is hyperoxemia in the intervillous space, all of which result in hypoxemia in fetal blood (Figure 3).
A PaO2 of greater than 100 mm Hg is often called hyperoxemia.
There are only two potential causes of hyperoxemia. The most common cause is exogenous oxygen therapy; however, this patient is breathing room air.