hyperoxaluria


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hyperoxaluria

 [hi″per-ok″sah-lu´re-ah]
an excess of oxalates in the urine, which can lead to formation of kidney stones. Called also oxaluria.
enteric hyperoxaluria formation of calcium oxalate calculi in the urinary tract, occurring after extensive resection or disease of the ileum, due to excessive absorption of oxalate from the colon.
primary hyperoxaluria an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by urinary excretion of oxalate, with nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, early onset of renal failure, and often a generalized deposit of calcium oxalate.

hy·per·ox·a·lu·ri·a

(hī'pĕr-ok'să-lyū'rē-ă),
Presence of an unusually large amount of oxalic acid or oxalates in the urine; renal stones may occur.
Synonym(s): oxaluria

hyperoxaluria

(hī′pər-ŏk′sə-lo͝or′ē-ə)
n.
The presence of an unusually large amount of oxalic acid or oxalates in the urine.

hyperoxaluria

A condition characterised by excess urinary oxalate (formula C2O4), which may lead to calcium oxalate stones in the pelvicalyceal system or urinary bladder.

Aetiology
Acute tubular necrosis, enteric hyperoxaluria, cystic fibrosis, coeliac disease, diabetes, foods (e.g., beef greens, rhubarb, spinach, beets, chard, okra, peanuts, chocolate, pecans, tea, carrots), short bowel syndrome.

Management, primary hyeroxaluria
High-dose pyridoxine, orthophosphate, magnesium, increased fluid volumes, glycosaminoglycans (pentosan polysulfate), dialysis.

Management, secondary hyeroxaluria
Calcium supplements, iron, aluminium, magnesium, potassium citrate, cholestyramine, diet (reduced fat, low meat, low oxalate foods).

hy·per·ox·a·lu·ri·a

(hī'pĕr-ok-să-lyūr'ē-ă)
Presence of an unusually large amount of oxalic acid or oxalates in the urine.
Synonym(s): oxaluria.

hy·per·ox·a·lu·ri·a

(hī'pĕr-ok-să-lyūr'ē-ă)
Presence of an unusually large amount of oxalic acid or oxalates in the urine.
Synonym(s): oxaluria.
References in periodicals archive ?
The woman in this case report had two known risk factors for hyperoxaluria. However, even in the absence of known risk factors, excessive oxalate consumption can, on rare occasions, have serious adverse effects.
Becky's six-year-old daughter Zoe also has primary hyperoxaluria and has undergone five procedures to remove kidney stones.
In individuals with hyperoxaluria, renal tubular epithelial cells were injured due to exposure to high oxalate concentrations or sharp calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals [10, 65, 66].
Tielens et al., "Hyperoxaluria is related to whewellite and hypercalciuria to weddellite: what happens when crystalline conversion occurs?," Comptes Rendus Chimie, vol.
Pursell et al., "Inhibition of glycolate oxidase with dicer-substrate siRNA reduces calcium oxalate deposition in a mouse model of primary hyperoxaluria type 1," Molecular Therapy, vol.
Aunque las manifestaciones clinicas son prevenibles con un diagnostico precoz, la mayoria de veces el diagnostico es tardio y se realiza en pacientes con enfermedad renal cronica terminal establecida, lo cual ocurre en mas del 30% de pacientes con hyperoxaluria primaria tipo 1 (2,3), donde el aumento en la produccion hepatica de oxalato supera los mecanismos de eliminacion del mismo, llevando a toxicidad directa, nefrocalcinosis (depositos de cristales a nivel intratubular e intersticial) y posterior obstruccion renal por litos, que usualmente se asocian a infecciones de las vias urinarias.
Three children received a dual liver and kidney transplant from a living relative (two siblings with primary hyperoxaluria type 1 and one patient with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease).
Genetic testing was pursued, and the results showed an AGXT mutation consistent with a type 1 primary hyperoxaluria. All preoperative liver testing results were within the normal limits.
With the increasing need for organs, livers explanted from patients with primary hyperoxaluria (PH), acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HFHC) are being used for DLT.
The inherited rare kidney stone disorders studied by the RKSC include cystinuria, primary hyperoxaluria, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, and Dent disease (see Table 1).
White urine is caused by proteinuria, pyuria from UTI, chyluria, filariasis, lymphatic fistula, schistosomiasis, lipiduria, propofol infusion, urinary TB, hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, phosphaturia, lead, and mercury [9].