hyperorality

hy·per·o·ral·i·ty

(hī'pĕr-ō-ral'i-tē),
A condition characterized by insertion of inappropriate objects in the mouth.
[hyper- + L. os (or-), mouth]

hyperorality

(hī″pĕr-ŏ-răl′ĭ-tē) [″ + ″]
Excessive chewing, sucking, lip smacking, or food craving. It is seen in some neurological disorders (e.g., Klüver-Bucy syndrome and Pick's disease).

hy·per·o·ral·i·ty

(hī'pĕr-ō-ral'i-tē)
A condition characterized by insertion of inappropriate objects in the mouth.
[hyper- + L. os (or-), mouth]
References in periodicals archive ?
Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS) is characterized by psychic blindness or visual agnosia, hypersexuality, emotional behavioral changes, especially placidity (decreased motor and verbal reaction against conditions that cause fear and anger), hyperorality, and hypermetamorphosis (increased interest in every object that enters the visual field) (1,2).
KBS should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with visual agnosia, hypersexuality, emotional behavioral changes, hyperorality or hypermetamorphosis.
(i) early (i.e., within the first three years of symptom onset) behavioral disinhibition, for example, socially inappropriate behavior, loss of manners or decorum, or impulsive actions; (ii) early apathy or inertia; (iii) early loss of sympathy or empathy, for example, diminished response to other people's needs and feelings and diminished social interest; (iv) early perseverative, stereotyped, or compulsive/ritualistic behavior, for example, repetitive movements and stereotypy of speech; (v) hyperorality and dietary changes, for example, altered food preferences, binge eating, and oral exploration of inedible objects; and (vi) executive dysfunction; with at least 3 of these 6 features required for a diagnosis of bvFTD.
The bvFTD is characterized by changes in social behavior and conduct, with loss of social awareness, poor impulse control, hyperorality, and dietary changes, as well as apathy and impaired performance in executive tasks [3].
Bilateral amygdalar damage in both humans and animals causes Kluver-Bucy syndrome, which encompasses behaviors of hyperorality and hyperphagia.
Behavioural disorder: insidious onset and slow progression; early loss of personal and social awareness; early signs of disinhibition; mental rigidity and inflexibility; and hyperorality, stereotyped and perseverative behaviour.
Avoid small, loose items because dementia residents tend to put everything in their mouths (hyperorality), which puts them at risk of choking.
Associated features are usually fears and anxiety, absence of facial expression, inability to attribute emotions to others, hyperorality or inability to adequately modulate sensory input (see Bachevalier, 1994 and 1997 for a review).
Clinical guidelines for FTD developed in 1994 include descriptions of behavior deterioration in areas of social awareness and hygiene, disinhibition, rigidity, hyperorality, stereotypy, impulsivity, and distractibility.
These changes may include sexually inappropriate behavior, poor hygiene, hyperorality, disinhibition, and perseverative behavior (Neary, Snowden, & Mann, 2000).
The FBI-ALS is comprised of the negative scale (measures apathy, emotional flatness, and aspontaneity) and the disinhibition scale (measures behaviors like inappropriateness, impulsivity, and hyperorality).
Disinhibition, apathy, social withdrawal, hyperorality, and ritualistic compulsive behaviors are the telltale symptoms, said Dr.