hypermobility syndrome


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Related to hypermobility syndrome: Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

hypermobile joint syndrome

(1) Joint hypermobility syndrome
A common benign childhood condition involving hypermobile joints which can move beyond the normal range of motion (ROM).
 
Clinical findings
Pain in knees, fingers, hips, elbows, increased tendency to dislocate, increased in scoliosis, which usually improves with age.
 
(2) Systemic joint laxity
A generalised increase in joint mobility, which may be seen in various rheumatic conditions associated with TMJ dysfunction.

hypermobility syndrome

A condition of abnormally lax ligaments and joints that affects up to 10% of all people. The result is an undue tendency to dislocations, recurrent sprains and joint pain.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lack of clinical distinction between the hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and the joint hypermobility syndrome (a.k.a.
The relationship between benign joint hypermobility syndrome and psychological distress: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Keer, "Hypermobility and the hypermobility syndrome," Manual Therapy, vol.
Impaired proprioceptive acuity at the proximal interphalangeal joint in patients with the hypermobility syndrome. Br J Rheumatol 1994;33:631-7.
Proprioception and muscle torque deficits in children with hypermobility syndrome. Rheumatology (Oxford).
Also, our study revealed a significant clinical application of the association between JHM and GERD that ignited a considerable scientific interest which may help us in follow-up and management of other visceral disorders of hypermobility syndrome.
Diseases Total, % Gender, % n = 3985 Male Female (n = 901) (n = 3084) RA 0.9 0.1 1.1 Seronegative 2.2 1.9 2.3 spondyloarthrop athy Psoriatic arthritis 0.3 0.6 0.2 Ankylosing 0.1 0.1 0.0 Spondylitis Enteropathic 0.0 -- 0.0 arthropathy Undifferentiated 1.6 1.1 1.8 seronegative Reactive arthritis 0.1 -- 0.2 Systemic lupus 0.1 -- 0.1 erythematosus Knee OA 25.8 27.8 25.2 Fibromyalgia 1.36 0.6 1.6 STR 7.0 8.2 6.7 Bursitis 2.0 2.0 2.0 Tendonitis 5.0 6.2 4.7 BJHS 2.8 1.7 3.1 Carpal tunnel 0.9 0.3 1.1 syndrome Gout 0.1 0.3 0.0 Lower back pain * 32.3 30.7 32.75 Osteopenia 22.4 16.3 24.2 Osteoporosis 3.1 2.7 3.2 BJHS: Benign joint hypermobility syndrome; STR: soft tissue rheumatism.
As a freshman, she underwent physical therapy for hypermobility syndrome. Her shoulders are looser than normal, so she must exercise to build them up.
Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) is an inherited condition characterized by joint hypermobility, connective tissue fragility, and soft velvety skin with variable hyperextensibility.
Findings from the medical history that indicate a predisposition to instability include generalized joint laxity, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, hyperhomocysteinuria, hyperlysinemia, benign joint hypermobility syndrome, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and previous shoulder or patellar dislocations.
They found that joint hypermobility syndrome as assessed by blinded raters was present in 68% of outpatients with an anxiety disorder, compared with 10% of psychiatric patient controls and 12.5% of medical patients (Am.