hypermnesia


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Related to hypermnesia: posthypnotic amnesia

hypermnesia

 [hi″perm-ne´zhah]
extreme retentiveness or unusual clarity of memory. adj. adj hypermnes´ic.

hy·perm·ne·si·a

(hī'pĕrm-nē'zē-ă),
1. Extreme power of memory.
2. A capacity under hypnosis for immediate registration and precise recall of many more individual items than is thought possible under ordinary circumstances. Compare: hypomnesia.
[hyper- + G. mnēmē, memory]

hypermnesia

(hī′pərm-nē′zhə)
n.
Exceptionally exact or vivid memory.

hypermnesia

(hī′pərm-nē′zhə)
n.
Exceptionally exact or vivid memory, especially as associated with certain mental illnesses.

hy′perm·ne′sic (-zĭk, -sĭk) adj.

hypermnesia

[hī′pərm·nē′zhə]
an extraordinarily good state of memory.

hy·perm·ne·si·a

(hī'pĕrm-nē'zē-ă)
1. Extreme power of memory.
2. A capacity under hypnosis for immediate registration and precise recall of many more individual items than is thought possible under ordinary circumstances.
Compare: hypomnesia
[hyper- + G. mnēmē, memory]

hypermnesia (hīˈ·perm·nēˑ·zhē·),

n the ability to remember past events in vivid detail, often enhanced when under hypnosis. See also hypnosis.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Post-traumatic stress is a hypermnesia of the trauma experienced," said professor Francis Eustache, a neuropsychologist and director of a unit at the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research of the University of Caen.
Payne, Hembrooke, and Anastasi's (1993) retrieval dynamics account of hypermnesia provides an additional theoretical explanation for increased recall across tests.
amp; PERFORMANCE 1 (1994) (reviewing literature on hypermnesia and
privileged moment of [Proustian] hypermnesia, time collapses in on
It seems only consistent that Theoctist's hypermnesia, which at first appears reminiscent of a parody or persiflage of the ancient ars memoriae or mnemotechnique (Simonides), is then positively connoted as it supplies the motivation for the preservation of The Khazar Dictionary from the threat of fiendish annihilation: Theoctist had learned by heart not only the Christian and Islamic parts of the texts, which were consigned to the flames by Nikon Sevast (an allusion here to the burning of the library in Umberto Eco's The Name of the Rose), but also the Jewish part, which was scattered by the winds on the battlefield of Kladovo in 1689.
The explanation would lead to the fact that if subliminal stimuli was frequently perceived, the messages could be effective to the point of mind control or adept hypermnesia (Ellenberger, 1970; Erderly, 1985).
Erdelyi and Becker called this phenomenon hypermnesia.
Hypermnesia is defined as ah increase in information recovery from memory as a result of multiple recall trials and aftera single learning phase.
The hypermnesia literature (for reviews see Erdelyi, 1996; Payne, 1987) reports improvement in recall across repeated recall tests owing only to the experience of taking those tests (Roediger & Payne, 1982).
AGE REGRESSION: The phenomenon of age regression is partly based on the mechanisms of amnesia and hypermnesia.
The story resembles the natural but morbid tendency for hypermnesia touched off when we know that we are about to die.