hypermature

hypermature

(hī″pĕr-mă-tūr′) [″ + L. maturus, ripe]
1. Pert. to anything that has passed the stage of maturity.
2. Overripe, as a cataract or abscess that has gone past the optimum time for removal or incision.
References in periodicals archive ?
6 (7.5%), mature cataract in 23 (28.75%), and hypermature in 4 (5%) eyes
In most of the cases, this was achieved with the exception of few cataracts like mature and hypermature cataracts.
It can occur in hypermature and traumatic cataract or in the late stages of some uveitic and infectious diseases.
Cataracts progress through four stages of maturity: incipient, immature, mature, and hypermature. In early stages, it can be difficult to differentiate cataracts from another common condition called nuclear sclerosis.
Tokyo, Japan) revealed bilateral multiple PPMs (iris-to-iris and iris-to-lens) and bilateral hypermature cataracts (Figure 1).
In a 1973 study by Kaye et al, (9) the authors found that when compared to the normal progressive maturation of cells in colonic crypts, "the hyperplastic epithelium exhibits a similar progression, the primary difference being that most of the morphological features of maturing and mature cells are found either lower in the crypt or in exaggerated form at the same level of the crypt when compared with normal mucosa in the same colon." A year later, Hayashi et al (10) used electron microscopy to show that the cells on the surface of hyperplastic polyps looked hypermature and demonstrated a decreased rate of migration in cells from base to surface when using autoradiography.
Those patients whose pupil was more than or equal to 3mm in size and those without significant cataract (mature or hypermature cortical cataract, or nuclear sclerosis grade III/more), which helped easy capturing of retinal photographs.
Ophthalmic examination revealed a hypermature cataract in the right lens and a resorbing cataract in the left lens.
In some instances the Type II lesion becomes hypermature and due to starvation dies to become a mummified inert calcified Type III lesion.
Secondary types of glaucoma result from an identifiable factor including underlying conditions such as uveitis, vascular diseases including diabetes, central retinal vein occlusion or carotid artery obstructive disease (neovascular glaucoma), lens disorders including mature or hypermature cataract (lens induced glaucoma) or ocular trauma.
Primary posterior capsular opacification in Indian rural population undergoing cataract surgery for hypermature senile cataract.