hypermagnesemia


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hypermagnesemia

 [hi″per-mag″nĕ-se´me-ah]
an abnormally high magnesium content of the blood plasma. See table of Electrolyte Imbalances at electrolyte.

hy·per·mag·ne·se·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-mag'nĕ-sē'mē-ă),
An abnormally large concentration of magnesium in the blood serum.

hypermagnesemia

/hy·per·mag·ne·se·mia/ (-mag″nĕ-se´me-ah) an abnormally large magnesium content of the blood plasma.

hypermagnesemia

[hī′pərmag′nisē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk hyper + magnesia, magnesium, haima, blood
a greater than normal amount of magnesium in the plasma, found in people with kidney failure and in those who use large doses of drugs containing magnesium, such as antacids. Toxic levels of magnesium cause cardiac arrhythmias and depression of deep tendon reflexes and respiration. Treatment often includes IV fluids, a diuretic, and hemodialysis.

hypermagnesemia

Magnesium intoxication A state characterized by ↑ serum magnesium, which is associated with ESRD, eclampsia therapy with magnesium sulfate, adrenocortical insufficiency–Addision's disease, uncontrolled DM, leukemia, hypothyroidism, magnesium-based antacid and laxative therapies Clinical Lethargy, shallow respiration, ↓ BP, ↓ tendon reflexes, ↓ neuromuscular transmission, ↓ CNS; symptoms correspond to magnesium serum levels: nausea occurs at 2-2.5 mmol/L–4-5 mEq/L → sedation, ↓ tendon reflexes, muscle weakness; at 2.5-5 mmol/L–5-10 mEq/L, hypotension, bradycardia, and systemic vasodilatation; arreflexia, coma, respiratory paralysis appear above these levels. See Magnesium.

hy·per·mag·ne·se·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-mag'nĕ-sē'mē-ă)
Excessive magnesium in blood; may be a result of chronic renal insufficiency, overuse of magnesium-containing laxatives or antacids, or severe dehydration. Signs include weakness, paralysis, drowsiness, confusion, bradycardia, hypotension, nausea, and vomiting.
Synonym(s): hypermagnesaemia.

Hypermagnesemia

An abnormally high concentration of magnesium in the blood.
Mentioned in: Magnesium Imbalance

hy·per·mag·ne·se·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-mag'nĕ-sē'mē-ă)
Excessive magnesium in blood; may be a result of chronic renal insufficiency, overuse of magnesium-containing laxatives or antacids, or severe dehydration. Signs include weakness, paralysis, drowsiness, confusion, bradycardia, hypotension, nausea, and vomiting.
Synonym(s): hypermagnesaemia.

hypermagnesemia (hī´purmag´-nəsē´mēə),

n an excess of magnesium in the blood serum. Normal range is 1.5 to 2.5 mEq/L. It may result in respiratory failure and coma and may occur in untreated diabetic acidosis, renal failure, and severe dehydration.

hypermagnesemia

an abnormally large magnesium content of the blood plasma.
References in periodicals archive ?
4 sec Short Hypocalcaemia, Hypermagnesemia P-P interval 0.
The use of magnesium containing enemas also requires caution, because magnesium is also excreted by the kidney and an impaired renal function would increase the risk for potentially lethal hypermagnesemia.
Historically, magnesium-containing phosphate binders have not been used due to concerns over hypermagnesemia.
Analysis of the brain bioavailability of peripherally administered magnesium sulfate: A study in humans with acute brain injury undergoing prolonged induced hypermagnesemia.
18] Hypermagnesemia and inhibition of the serum calcium raising effect of parathyroid hormone in rats.
A case of prolonged apnea probably caused by vecuronium potentiated with hypermagnesemia.
These have included hypokalemia, hypermagnesemia, hyperglycemia and thrombocytopenia as reported in 13 percent of the patients (n=40).
Abstract: The authors describe a case of fatal hypermagnesemia caused by an Epsom salt enema.
Hypermagnesemia [too much magnesium] may develop in people with renal insufficiency; the levels of toxicity are not clearly defined, but central nervous system depression appears at levels of approximately 8-10 mEq/L.
The most common Grade 3/4 adverse reactions (>5%) regardless of causality in Study 1 (n=102) were infections (11%) and asthenia/fatigue (8%), and in Study 2 (n=83) were lymphopenia (37%), infections (33%), neutropenia (27%), leukopenia (22%), anemia (16%), asthenia/fatigue (14%), thrombocytopenia (14%), hypophosphatemia (10%), vomiting (10%), dermatitis/exfoliative dermatitis (8%), hypermagnesemia (8%), hyperuricemia (8%), hypocalcemia (6%), nausea (6%), and pruritus (6%).
Kontani M, Hara A, Ohta S, Ikeda T Hypermagnesemia induced by massive cathartic ingestion in an elderly woman without pre-existing renal dysfunction.