hyperlucent

hy·per·lu·cent

(hī'pĕr-lū'sĕnt),
A region on a chest film showing greater than normal film blackening from increased transmission of x-rays. See: unilateral hyperlucent lung.
[hyper- + L. lucens, shining, fr. luceo, to shine]

hy·per·lu·cent

(hī'pĕr-lū'sĕnt)
A region on a radiograph showing greater than normal film blackening resulting from increased transmission of x-rays.
[hyper- + L. lucens, shining, fr. luceo, to shine]
References in periodicals archive ?
Hyperlucent area containing an air-fluid level in lower 1/3 of the right lung and chest opacity in lower 1/2 of right hemithorax, with concave superior interface border.
On radiographs, CPAMs are hyperlucent and multicystic, with occasional solid components.
One study evaluating the role of special radiological signs in the diagnosis of pneumothorax in neonates found that 46% of the neonates with pneumothorax had special radiological signs 0.5 to 27 hours before they were clinically diagnosed, namely, deep sulcus sign, medial stripe sign, basilar hyperlucency, increased cardiomediastinal sharpness, large hyperlucent hemithorax, and the double diaphragm sign [110].
They include Rigler's sign, hyperlucent liver sign, doge cap sign, falciform ligament sign, urachus sign, football sign, cupola sign, and air under diaphragm [6].
Hyperlucent lung was observed in early stages of FBA, while atelectasis or consolidation indicated a fairly advanced stage.
The chest radiograph of patients with UAPA typically shows asymmetric lung fields, with an ipsilateral small hemithorax holding a hyperlucent lung.
The presence of a mass at the apex of a triangular hyperlucent lung parenchyma (as seen in our case, Figure 1) is highly suggestive of BA although nonpathognomonic.
Chest radiograph showed hyperlucent lungs with atelectatic bands in both lower zones and blunting of the right costophrenic angle.
Presented in sections on the chest wall, pleura, and mediastinum; pulmonary opacities; and hyperlucent abnormalities, the images include pleural effusions, anterior mediastinal mass, segmental and lobar opacities, multiple nodules and masses, and hyperlucent thorax.
Chest radiographic signs include a unilateral hyperlucent lung field with collapse of the lung, tracheal deviation and mediastinal displacement (see Figure 4) (Ho & Gutierrez 2009).
Chest radiograph (Figure 1) showed hyperlucent right lung with decreased vascular markings and a small hilar shadow.