hyperlucent

hy·per·lu·cent

(hī'pĕr-lū'sĕnt),
A region on a chest film showing greater than normal film blackening from increased transmission of x-rays. See: unilateral hyperlucent lung.
[hyper- + L. lucens, shining, fr. luceo, to shine]

hy·per·lu·cent

(hī'pĕr-lū'sĕnt)
A region on a radiograph showing greater than normal film blackening resulting from increased transmission of x-rays.
[hyper- + L. lucens, shining, fr. luceo, to shine]
References in periodicals archive ?
Hyperlucent lung was observed in early stages of FBA, while atelectasis or consolidation indicated a fairly advanced stage.
The chest radiograph of patients with UAPA typically shows asymmetric lung fields, with an ipsilateral small hemithorax holding a hyperlucent lung.
Chest radiograph showed hyperlucent lungs with atelectatic bands in both lower zones and blunting of the right costophrenic angle.
Presented in sections on the chest wall, pleura, and mediastinum; pulmonary opacities; and hyperlucent abnormalities, the images include pleural effusions, anterior mediastinal mass, segmental and lobar opacities, multiple nodules and masses, and hyperlucent thorax.
Chest radiographic signs include a unilateral hyperlucent lung field with collapse of the lung, tracheal deviation and mediastinal displacement (see Figure 4) (Ho & Gutierrez 2009).
Chest radiograph (Figure 1) showed hyperlucent right lung with decreased vascular markings and a small hilar shadow.
In 1953, Swyer and James (1) described unilateral, hyperlucent lung syndrome in a 6-year-old boy.
Ad7 infections have also been associated with diseases of the central nervous system (8,9) and long-term respiratory sequelae that include bronchiectasis and hyperlucent lung or McLeod syndrome (10).
Swyer James syndrome is an uncommon abnormality characterized radiologically by hyperlucent lobe or lung and functionally by air trapping during expiration.
On CT, the bronchovascular tissue in this region is proportionally less than in the remainder of the lungs, and some of the left lung vessels were shown to be convex anteriorly (white arrows) indicating increasing volume of the hyperlucent region when compared to the prior CT (Figure 4).