hyperlucency

hyperlucency

/hy·per·lu·cen·cy/ (-loo´sen-se) excessive radiolucency.

hyperlucency

Imaging A region on a plain film with ↓ tissue density, allowing for ↑ transmission of X-rays

hyperlucency

(hī″pĕr-loo′sĕn-sē)
In radiology, increased radiolucency.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other signs of pneumoperitoneum on supine abdominal film include the doge's cap sign (triangular collection of gas in Morrison's pouch), large area of hyperlucency over the liver shadow, parahepatic air (gas bubble lateral to the right edge of the liver), air outlining the fissure of ligamentum teres and the cupola sign (gas trapped below central tendon of diaphragm).
24) Radiographic findings include hyperlucency in the lower chest, depression of the ipsilateral diaphragm and deepening of the lateral costophrenic sulcus.
Classical chest X-ray signs for a tension pneumothorax include a visible lung edge running parallel to the chest wall, hyperlucency, deep sulcus sign and abdominal quadrant hyperlucency.
The dentist had noted an area of hyperlucency of the left palate during a routine examination.
It is well documented that SJS is a rare syndrome characterized by unilateral hyperlucency of one lung, lobe or part of a lobe which was first described in 1953 by Swyer and James (2) and further detailed by MacLeod (and called Swyer-James-MacLeod Syndrome (SJMS)).
The chest X-ray finding of SJMS is a noticeable one-sided hyperlucency caused by oligemia of the involved lung segments.
His sinus CT showed areas of hyperlucency within the maxillary sinuses and the nose, and his nasal polyps were large enough to cause obstruction and nasal septal deviation, Dr.
1,2,7,10) The transverse band of air sign (air in the transverse sinus of the pericardium) (2,10) and the triangle of air sign (a hyperlucency behind the sternum, anterior to the cardiac base and the aortic root) (2,10) are useful in distinguishing pneumopericardium from pneumomediastinum.
An SPN that involves a peripheral bronchus, seen on CT as an endoluminal filling defect or as bronchiectasis, mucus plugging, or peripheral hyperlucency distal to the lesion, should suggest a malignant SPN due to carcinoid tumor (Figure 14) or bronchogenic carcinoma, as granulomas and hamartomas rarely arise endobronchially as depicted on CT.
In adults, the presentation chest X-ray typically has infiltrates (37%), hyperlucency (16%), collapse (11%), local bronchiectasis (5%), pleural effusion (7 to 16%), empyema (5%) and normal (11 to 30%) (1,3,4-9).
CT findings have been described by Zissin as atelectasis (53%), hyperlucency (37%), bronchiectasis (26%), lobar consolidation (16%), ipsilateral pleural effusion (16%), ipsilateral hilar adenopathy (26%) and thickened bronchial walls adjacent to the foreign body (37%) (3).
Unilateral Hyperlucency and Lung Abscess in a 20-Year-Old Woman