hyperlordosis

hy·per·lor·do·sis

(hī'pĕr-lōr-dō'sis),
Extreme lordosis.

hy·per·lor·do·sis

(hī'pĕr-lōr-dō'sis)
An abnormal anteriorly convex curvature of the spine, usually lumbar.

hy·per·lor·do·sis

(hī'pĕr-lōr-dō'sis)
An abnormal anteriorly convex curvature of the spine, usually lumbar.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sticking your bottom out If your bottom tends to stick out or you have a pronounced curve in your lower back, you may have hyperlordosis, which is an exaggerated inward curve in the lower back.
This can be important if the client has irritation or inflammation of the facets, common in people who have the typical lower-crossed syndrome marked by excessive anterior pelvic tilt and hyperlordosis of the lumbar spine.
33] Another debilitating feature is hyperlordosis, which can lead to difficulty rising from a chair or rising from a bed due to the simultaneous contractures of both the paraspinal and abdominal muscles.
5) Compared with other forms of MPS, Morquio syndrome tends to have greater skeletal manifestations and spine involvement such as scoliosis, kyphosis, hyperlordosis, severe gibbus, flaring of the lower ribs as well as platyspondyly, pectus carinatum metacarpals, and small carpal bones (often with some absent).
Hyperlordosis as a possible factor in the development of spinal cord infarction.
The investigators inferred that, in the group fused in kyphosis, compensatory hyperlordosis at the cranial adjacent level led to lordotic contracture of the posterior ligaments.
This study corroborates the importance of fusing the lumbar spine in situ or in hyperlordosis to prevent compensatory increased adjacent segment motion, which may predispose to early degeneration.
These exaggeratedy turned-out positions can lead to pain, spondylolisthesis (stress fracture and forward slippage of the spine), hyperlordosis, and more serious injuries.
Due to this typical imbalance of anterior/posterior pelvic tilt musculature, the common sagittal plane postural distortion pattern of the lumbar spine is hyperlordosis.
Several other skeletal and extra-skeletal anomalies have also been described; these include hypoplastic or abnormally elongated clavicles, lumbar hyperlordosis, rounded appearance of the vertebral bodies, rib anomalies and overconstriction of the femora and tibiae.
Physical examination showed pes equinus, lumbar hyperlordosis and early rigid spine syndrome with scoliosis.
There is often hyperlordosis of the lumbar spine which compensates for the fixed flexion deformities at the hips.