hyperlipidaemia

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Related to hyperlipidemic: hypolipidemic

hyperlipidaemia

An abnormal increase in the levels of fats (lipids), including cholesterol, in the blood. This may be of dietary origin or may be due to PANCREATITIS or bile system disorder or may be a dangerous familial disorder of dominant inheritance. Most people with familial hyperlipidaemia develop serious coronary artery disease before the age of 50.

hy·per·lip·id·e·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-lip'i-dē'mē-ă)
Elevated levels of lipids in the blood plasma.
Synonym(s): hyperlipidaemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Antihyperlipidemic Activity of methanolic extract of Garlic (Allium sativum L.) in Triton X-100 induced hyperlipidemic rats.
BBR binds directly to the ligand-binding domain of PPAR[alpha] and upregulates CPT-1a gene and protein expression in HepG2 cells and hyperlipidemic rat liver [120].
Chiu, "Plasmapheresis for hyperlipidemic pancreatitis," Journal of Clinical Apheresis, vol.
During follow-up, 0.5% of the baseline hyperlipidemic women were diagnosed with breast cancer, as were 0.8% of controls.
Webster III, "Clinical assessment of hyperlipidemic pancreatitis," American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol.
In this study, the protective effects of YCL on vascular endothelial functions in hyperlipidemic rats were revealed through molecular biological techniques.
A meta-analytic assessment showed that prevalence of hyperlipidemia varies from 60-80% in patients of NAFLD.19 In our study all patients were hyperlipidemic it was found that after three months treatment with vildagliptin there was significant improvement in deranged lipid profile especially triglycerides which have strong association with NAFLD.
Anti hyperlipidemic activity of Pedalium murex (Linn.) fruits on high fat diet fed rats.
The level of sICAM-1 is elevated in hyperlipidemic individuals and associated with high cardiovascular risk (Karasek et al.
Moreover, LDLr-/- mice fed with hyperlipidemic diets showed insulin resistance (Garcia et al., 2011) and increased oxidative stress (Krieger et al., 2006), which sustain the atherogenesis and LVH in this study.
Medico-legal questions to be addressed are whether the company had prior knowledge of the risk and failed to warn and were the patients actually harmed by Lipitor and not their diabetes, given that diabetes is a very common disease and may be linked more to genetics and/or an underlying metabolic syndrome in those who are hyperlipidemic, hypertensive, or obese--the very same patients likely to be on a statin?