hyperlipemia


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Related to hyperlipemia: hypothyroidism, Triglycerides

hyperlipemia

 [hi″per-lĭ-pe´me-ah]
carbohydrate-induced hyperlipemia hyperlipoproteinemia (type IV).
fat-induced hyperlipemia hyperlipoproteinemia (type I).

hy·per·li·pe·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-li-pē'mē-ă),
Elevated levels of lipids in the blood plasma. There are several types of hyperlipemia; one is associated with a deficiency of δ-aminoadipic semialdehyde synthase.
See also: lipemia, hyperlipidemia.

hyperlipemia

/hy·per·li·pe·mia/ (-lĭ-pe´me-ah) hyperlipidemia.
carbohydrate-induced hyperlipemia  elevated blood lipids, particularly triglycerides, after carbohydrate ingestion; sometimes used synonymously with hyperlipoproteinemia type IV or V phenotypes, or the genetic disorders causing them.
combined fat- and carbohydrate-induced hyperlipemia  persistently elevated blood levels of very-low-density lipoproteins and chylomicrons after ingestion of fat or carbohydrates; sometimes used synonymously with a type V hyperlipoproteinemia or the genetic disorders causing it.
endogenous hyperlipemia  elevated plasma lipids derived from body stores (i.e., very-low-density lipoproteins), rather than dietary sources; used as a generic descriptor of the type IV hyperlipoproteinemia phenotype.
essential familial hyperlipemia  an inherited disorder causing a type I hyperlipoproteinemia phenotype, or the phenotype itself.
exogenous hyperlipemia  elevated plasma levels of lipoproteins derived from dietary sources (i.e., chylomicrons); used as a generic descriptor of the type I hyperlipoproteinemia phenotype.
familial fat-induced hyperlipemia  persistently elevated blood chylomicrons after fat ingestion; sometimes used synonymously with hyperlipoproteinemia type I phenotype or the genetic disorders causing it.
mixed hyperlipemia  generic designation for a hyperlipoproteinemia in which several classes of lipoproteins are elevated; usually used to denote a type V phenotype, but sometimes used for a type II-b phenotype.

hyperlipemia

(hī′pər-lĭ-pē′mē-ə, -lī-)

hyperlipemia

[-lipē′mē·ə]
cloudy or opaque plasma caused by fat particles called chylomicrons seen subsequent to a fat-laden meal caused by a lipoprotein lipase deficiency or a defect in the conversion of low-density lipoprotein to high-density lipoprotein.

hy·per·li·pe·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-li-pē'mē-ă)
An elevated level of lipids in the blood.
See also: lipemia
Synonym(s): hyperlipaemia.
[hyper- + G. lipos, fat, + haima, blood]

hyperlipemia

an excess of lipids in the blood.

equine hyperlipemia
a metabolic disease of pony mares in late pregnancy or early lactation. The serum has milky opalescence. Clinically there is lethargy progressing to coma, diarrhea and acidosis. Most cases terminate fatally.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hyperlipemia is a blood disorder characterized by the presence of excess lipids in the blood which causes arterial sclerosis.
com/reports/c62851) has announced the addition of "Blood and Lymphatic System - Hyperlipemia Drug Pipeline Report" to their offering.
Berberine and its derivatives showed many pharmacological effects for treating tumor, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hyperlipemia, inflammation, bacterium, and so on.
The most common laboratory abnormalities (incidence greater than or equal to 30 percent) are anemia (94 percent), hyperglycemia (89 percent), hyperlipemia (87 percent, hypertriglyceridemia (83 percent), elevated alkaline phosphatase (68 percent), elevated serum creatinine (57 percent), lymphopenia (53 percent), hypophosphatemia (49 percent), thrombocytopenia (40 percent), elevated AST (38 percent), and leukopenia (32 percent).
The root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi (Labiatae) is a widely used herb in the traditional medical systems of China and Japan, where it has been used as an ingredient in botanical formulations for many years with positive results for inflammatory diseases, allergies, hyperlipemia, and arteriosclerosis (Bruno et al.
The principal adverse reactions of Prograf include tremor, headache, hypertension, gastrointestinal disturbance, abnormal renal function, hyperglycemia, leukopenia, CMV infection, infection, and hyperlipemia.
The most common laboratory abnormalities (incidence greater than or equal to 30%) are anemia, hyperglycemia, hyperlipemia, hypertriglyceridemia, elevated alkaline phosphatase, elevated serum creatinine, lymphopenia, hypophosphatemia, thrombocytopenia, elevated AST, and leukopenia.
These 39 patients consisted of 13 patients with diabetes, 9 with hyperlipemia, 10 with liver disorders, and 7 with kidney disorders.
Adverse events in Study L1069-18 included asthenia, nausea, hyperlipemia, vomiting, headache, exfoliative dermatitis, and anorexia.
1), an active component isolated from Cortex Moutan radix, a Chinese herbal remedy widely used in clinical treatment of inflammatory diseases, including atopic dermatitis, hyperlipemia, and atherosclerosis.
Because LDL-C plays a causal role in the development of atherosclerosis, the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel (5) and other scientific societies have identified LDL-C concentrations as the primary criterion for diagnosis and treatment of patients with hyperlipemia (HPL).