hyperleukocytosis

hyperleukocytosis

 [hi″per-loo″ko-si-to´sis]
extreme leukocytosis, as seen in certain forms of leukemia.

hy·per·leu·ko·cy·to·sis

(hī'pĕr-lū'kō-sī-tō'sis),
An unusually great increase in the number and proportion of leukocytes in the circulating blood or the tissues; that is, much more than that ordinarily observed in most instances of leukocytosis.

hyperleukocytosis

/hy·per·leu·ko·cy·to·sis/ (-loo″ko-si-to´sis) abnormally excessive numbers of leukocytes in the blood.

hyperleukocytosis

(hī′pər-lo͞o′kə-sī-tō′sĭs)
n.
An unusually large increase in the number and proportion of white blood cells in the blood or the tissues.

hy·per·leu·ko·cy·to·sis

(hī'pĕr-lū'kō-sī-tō'sis)
An increase in the number and proportion of leukocytes in the circulating blood or the tissues greater than that ordinarily observed in most instances of leukocytosis.

hyperleukocytosis

excess of leukocytes in the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an auto-inflammatory disorder, characterized by spiking fevers, evanescent salmon-pink rash, arthritis or arthralgia, and hyperleukocytosis.
Leukocytosis occurs when the white blood cell count is generally greater than 10,000-11,000/[micro]L, while hyperleukocytosis is when the WBC count is greater than 100,000/[micro]L.
9]/L in the following cases: disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), hyperleukocytosis or coagulation disorders (i.
Blast crisis is only used to describe hyperleukocytosis in CML.
His blood test showed high lipase level of 14069 UI/L (regular range: <67 UI/L), a hyperleukocytosis with 14670 units/[micro]L (regular range: 4000 to 10000 units/[micro]L), a hyperneutrophilia with 12264 units/[micro]L (regular range: 2400 to 7500 units/[micro]L), a CRP level of 178 mg/L (normal range: <5.
In people with hyperleukocytosis secondary to leukemia and other myeloproliferative neoplasias, neurologic signs, such as hearing loss, (33) vertigo, (8) ataxia, (9) headache, (9) nystagmus, (9) and other neurologic signs, have been described, secondary to hyperviscosity syndrome.
Hyperleukocytosis is normally associated with ocular, cerebrovascular dysfunction and bleeding abnormalities, but only 8 of these patients had severe headache, while 2 had altered level of consciousness and one the patient had bleeding diathesis.
Hematologic emergencies include febrile neutropenia, hyperviscosity syndrome (HVS), hyperleukocytosis and leukostasis and bleeding.
Early recognition of reverse pseudohyperkalemia in heparin plasma samples during leukemic hyperleukocytosis can prevent iatrogenic hypokalemia.
Dominic Wire, a bubbly 3 year old from Wolsingham, County Durham was rushed into the Great North Children's Hospital (GNCH) in March last year with hyperleukocytosis.
Leukaemic patients may be affected by other prothrombotic factors, including hyperleukocytosis, increased tissue factor (TF) expression, and finally the prothrombotic properties of therapeutic agents such as L-asparaginase.
In contrast to leukostasis, leukemic pulmonary infiltration has been defined in AML patients without hyperleukocytosis, suggesting that the type of blasts and their affinity for the pulmonary endothelium may be involved in the development of ARF.