hyperlactatemia

hyperlactatemia

, hyperlactemia (hī″pĕr-lak″tă-tē′mē-ă) [ hyper- + lactate + -emia]
Increased levels of lactate in the blood, without evidence of lactic acidosis or shock.
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Hyperlactatemia, increased osmolar gap, and renal dysfunction during continuous lorazepam infusion.
Prognostic Value of Hyperlactatemia and Lactate Clearance After Mitral Valve Surgery.
Our previous study confirmed that stepwise lactate kinetics-oriented hemodynamic therapy can reduce mortality in patients with sepsis-associated hyperlactatemia as compared to ScvO[sub]2-oriented therapy.[6] The lactate clearance rate is often the endpoint that needs to be achieved by a series of hemodynamic therapies and is therefore considered to be the best indicator of anaerobic metabolism by far despite that lactate change has hysteresis.[7] In addition, raised lactate levels are a well-recognized parameter for a poor prognosis.[8] Therefore, the outcome of CHT or a hemodynamic clinical trial should be recommended lactate clearance, not patient survival.
His blood test showed leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, hyperlactatemia, coagulopathy, and raised C-reactive protein and creatinine levels.
Prospective analytical cohort study with a follow-up between April 2016 and July 2017 of patients diagnosed with hemorrhagic shock, (5) defined as systemic arterial hypotension (SBP< 90 mm Hg or mean arterial pressure (MAP) <70 mm Hg), associated with signs of tissue hypoperfusion and hyperlactatemia. Inclusion criteria were patients taken to emergency surgery who had the study variables: blood gases plus serum lactate, vital signs, use of blood products and vasopressors, and SI, identified on admission and after 6 hours.
We previously reported that fasted rats, but not fed ones, submitted to an intensive forced swimming had the exhaustion time associated with hypoglycemia and hyperlactatemia (3).
Among our BMT patients, we observed that when hemorrhage was accompanied by TBI, coagulopathy, and hyperlactatemia at time of admission, death occurred despite all interventions.
Hyperlactatemia is common to both heart failure and hypothermia.
Hyperlactatemia is, however, regarded as a reasonable marker of sepsis severity, with higher levels predictive of higher mortality [32].
Of the 9 patients sent to the ICU, mean lactic acid level was 2.6 [+ or -] 2.39 mmol/L and base deficit was -5 [+ or -] 1.4 mmol/L; 6 (66.7%) patients had hyperlactatemia.