hyperkyphosis

hy·per·ky·pho·sis

(hī'pĕr-kī-fō'sis)
An abnormal exaggeration of the normal forward (flexion) curvature of the thoracic spine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Women's Health Initiative found that these same benefits may also guard against a woman's risk of developing hyperkyphosis, an exaggerated curvature of the spine that creates a forward-stooped posture.
Hyperkyphosis (also known as "dowager's hump") affects as many as 20 to 40 percent of older adults.
Keeping good posture in mind throughout the day and correcting bad habits such as hunching over a desk by getting your body back in alignment quickly will go a long way toward correcting and preventing hyperkyphosis (see Moves of the Month for a wall exercise that quickly aligns your body).
COMPONENT POSTURAL DYSFUNCTIONS OF UPPER CROSSED SYNDROME Hyperkyphosis of thoracic spine Hypolordosis/kyphosis of lower cervical spine* Hyperlordosis of upper cervical spine and head* Anterior translation of the head* Protraction of scapulae Medial rotation of humeri * Together, these components comprise protracted (anteriorly held) head.
Therefore, poor hamstring extensibility has been associated with thoracic hyperkyphosis (Fisk et al.
Her family history revealed that her father suffers from chronic spinal pain particularly in the thoracic region with notable hyperkyphosis of the thoracic spine, bilateral wrist pain with weakness and aquagenic pruritis.
Thoracic hyperkyphosis is not only a disfiguring effect of osteoporosis but may also play a considerable role in gait disorder, instability, and risk of falls (14).
Among the conditions addressed are hyperkyphosis, carpal tunnel syndrome, patellofemoral syndrome, plantar fasciitis and tendinopathy.