hyperglycaemia


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Related to hyperglycaemia: hypoglycemia, hypoglycaemia, hyperglycemia, diabetes mellitus

hy·per·gly·ce·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-glī-sē'mē-ă)
An abnormally high concentration of glucose in the blood, a feature of diabetes mellitus.
Synonym(s): hyperglycaemia.
[hyper- + G. glykys, sweet, + haima, blood]

hyperglycaemia

Excessive levels of glucose in the blood. This is a feature of untreated or undertreated DIABETES MELLITUS.

hyperglycaemia

see GLYCOSURIA.

hyperglycaemia

abnormally high level of blood glucose usually indicative of diabetes mellitus. See also blood glucose, diabetes, insulin.

hyperglycaemia

blood glucose levels higher than the upper limit of the normal range; normal random blood glucose (RBG) = <10 mmol/L; normal fasting blood glucose (FBG) = 2.9-5.9 mmol/L; patients with FBG = 5.9-6.7 mmol/L are borderline diabetics, requiring a glucose tolerance test to exclude diabetes mellitus; two consecutive FBGs = >6.7 mmol/L diagnose diabetes mellitus; persistent hyperglycaemia requires emergency treatment with insulin therapy to prevent ketoacidosis and coma

hy·per·gly·ce·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-glī-sē'mē-ă)
Abnormally high concentration of glucose in the circulating blood, seen in diabetes mellitus.
Synonym(s): hyperglycaemia.
[hyper- + G. glykys, sweet, + haima, blood]
References in periodicals archive ?
When blood glucose levels become too high it is known as hyperglycaemia.
The impact of post-prandial hyperglycaemia (PPH) on diabetes management.
Post-prandial hyperglycaemia (PPH): Missed work time and reduced productivity among people with diabetes.
Table 1 Summary of findings into refractive change during treatment of hyperglycaemia in diabetes Author N Diabetes type Eva et al.
Hyperglycaemia was defined as a BGL [greater than or equal to] 150 mg/dl and further subdivided into three categories of severity: 1) [greater than or equal to] 150 mg/dl, 2) [greater than or equal to] 175 mg/dl and 3) [greater than or equal to] 200 mg/dl according to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines and the American Diabetes Association (4,5).
Age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, antibiotic resistance, history of diabetes, insulin treatment and hyperglycaemia ([greater than or equal to] 175 mg/dl at DO) were entered in the logistic regression model to control for confounders and to assess their independent relationship with in-hospital mortality.
Upon onset of BSI, hyperglycaemia by severity was observed in 22.
In univariate analysis, age, acute renal failure, APACHE II score, antibiotic resistance and hyperglycaemia ([greater than or equal to] 175 mg/dl and [greater than or equal to] 200 mg/dl) were found to be associated with poor outcome.
We investigated a series of adult critically ill patients with ICU-acquired BSI in order to verify whether the degree of hyperglycaemia upon onset of BSI was associated with increased mortality.
Although the findings of the present study may not support the previous hypothesis, hyperglycaemia was shown to negatively impact patients' outcome, whereas insulin treatment was shown to have no influence.
Our results demonstrate that hyperglycaemia was associated with increased risk for adverse outcome in a heterogeneous ICU population with ICU-acquired BSI.
Hyperglycaemia in critically ill patients: marker or mediator of mortality?