hypergamy


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hypergamy

(hī-pĕr′gă-mē) [″ + gamos, marriage]
The tendency of women to reproduce with men of equal or higher social standing.
References in periodicals archive ?
(7) Hypergamy was not universally regarded as violating social norms in Jane Austen's day, but Austen clearly depicts characters such as General Tilney and Lady Catherine De Bourgh in Pride and Prejudice who view it in this way.
Constable N, 2005, "Introduction: cross-border marriages, gendered mobility, and global hypergamy", in Cross-border Marriages: Gender and Mobility in Transnational Asia Ed.
The contrast between hypergamy and hypogamy is implied, for example, by Uther's revision of Antti Aarne's and Stith Thompson's motif indexing system, in which tales are classed according to marital variations (e.g.
If the trends in education continue, prevalence in educational hypergamy will continue to decrease, researchers said.
Finally, the match matrices reveal that the practice of hypergamy is more common than hypogamy, with the incidence being highest in immigrants from Mexico, followed by South America.
A hypergamy parameter Hyper is added to the equation expressing that--in the absence of homogamy--women tend to partner up with respect to education while men tend to partner with women who achieved lower levels of education than they did themselves.
There are several examples of women (85, 86) who married counter to the Chinese preference for hypergamy (women marrying into higher-status households): the behavior of these wives stimulated marital disputes that resulted in wife-killing.
This idea that Blacks marry Whites for status, hypergamy, has also been refuted by Foeman and Nance (1999) who stated that, "These factors indicate that other variables are more important than simple social-economic exchange, and that greater equity rather than disparity increases the likelihood of interracial coupling" (p.
This indigenous reformist agenda worked in tandem with the stated "reformist" goals of the colonial order to reduce bride-price payments, to suppress hypergamy, to eradicate female infanticide, and to ensure a steady supply of domestic labors to cultivating males by recognizing the leviratic marriage of widows.
One reason for this disappearing "marriage success gap" is that highly educated women no longer feel the need to marry men who are more successful than they are, a phenomenon known as hypergamy, or marrying up.
Various authors have proposed that along with theories of hypergamy (i.e., marrying to gain status) and propinquity (i.e., interracial marriages that occur due to proximity of socialization between two racial groups), Asian American women's choices to outmarry (i.e., marry someone other than another Asian or Asian American) may be due in part to internalized racist stereotypes of Asian and Asian American men (Fujino, 1997).
The process of consolidation was accompanied by harsher strictures on endogamy and, later, as social prestige within the community displaced concerns of group superiority, by the institutionalization of hypergamy. Intermarriages between Kanbis and Kolis, earlier permissible, ceased.