hyperfiltration

hyperfiltration

 [hi″per-fil-tra´shun]
an elevation in the filtration rate of the renal glomeruli, often a sign of early insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

hyperfiltration

/hy·per·fil·tra·tion/ (-fil-tra´shun) an elevation in the glomerular filtration rate, often a sign of early type 1 diabetes mellitus.
References in periodicals archive ?
83) In a recent meta-analysis collating experimental studies in obese CKD patients, interventions aimed at reducing body weight showed coherent reductions in blood pressure, glomerular hyperfiltration and proteinuria.
This state of hyperfiltration can go on for years with no overt signs of kidney trouble.
Nowadays, it is believed that hemodynamic factors, such as systemic hypertension, glomerular hypertension and glomerular hyperfiltration, as well as ultrastructural changes at the level of the glomeruli such as thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and loss of negatively charged proteoglycans, are important factors in the development of albuminuria in diabetic nephropathy [4-6].
In the paper "Chaperonin-Containing t-Complex Protein-1 Subunit [beta] as a Possible Biomarker for the Phase of Glomerular Hyperfiltration of Diabetic Nephropathy" [1] by C.
Systemic hypertension leads to increased capillary hydrostatic pressure and hyperfiltration, which may eventually cause glomerulosclerosis and proteinuria [2].
Along with the development of obesity, fast body weight gain increases tubular sodium reabsorption in the kidney, which in turn leads to renal vasodilation and glomerular hyperfiltration and eventually results in an increased glomerular filtration rate.
Impact of gender and endothelin on renal vasodilation and hyperfiltration induced by relaxin in conscious rats.
Functional changes occur in the nephron at the level of the glomerulus, including glomerular hyperfiltration and hyperperfusion, before the onset of any measurable clinical changes.
The hyperfiltration of the functioning nephrons causes structural alterations of the afferent arterioles, leading to glomerulosclerosis (Porth, 2009).
Glomerular hyperfiltration (GHF) was defined as eGFR>140ml/min [23].
8] Derangement of renal function observed in SCA is partly explained by hyperfiltration and hyperperfusion.
Obstructive sleep apnea is common in patients with type 2 diabetes and is also associated with glomerular hyperfiltration and proteinuria in patients with normal renal function, which raised the question of whether it might be related to chronic kidney disease progression, Dr.