hypereuryprosopic

hy·per·eu·ry·pro·so·pic

(hī'pĕr-yū'ri-prō-so'pik),
Pertaining to or characterized by a very low and wide face.
[hyper- + G. eurys, wide, + prosōpon, face]

hy·per·eu·ry·pro·so·pic

(hīpĕr-yūri-prō-sopik)
Pertaining to or characterized by a very low and wide face.
[hyper- + G. eurys, wide, + prosōpon, face]
References in periodicals archive ?
This classification of facial types is as follows; mesoprosopic type (84.0-87.9), euryprosopic type (79.0-83.9), hypereuryprosopic type (<78.9), leptoprosopic type (88.0-92.9), hyperleptoprosopic type (>93.0) (Mane et al.).
reported that the face types for Japanese adult females was mesoprosopic (30.53 %), euryprosopic (25 %) and hypereuryprosopic (28.85 %), a finding different to the present study.
In the Garson classification of facial index there are five types: hypereuryprosopic ([less than or equal to]78.9), euryprosopic (79.0 to 83.9), mesoprosopic (84.0 to 87.9), leptoprosopic (88.0 to 92.9), and hyperleptoprosopic ([greater than or equal to]93.0) (Inaba et al.).
Most of the Chakma females (68%) examined in the present study have hypereuryprosopic or very broad face (Figure 2(a)).
In this study, the facial index showed that Chakma females were hypereuryprosopic (very broad face) followed by euryprosopic (broad face) which is in accordance with Bhasin [28] who described Mongoloids as a very broad or euryprosopic face to medium broad or mesoprosopic face.
This study showed that the adult Bangladeshi Buddhist Chakma females are mostly hyperbrachycephalic, hypereuryprosopic, and mesorrhine, with intermediate eyes and long narrow ears.
Face shape was classified by the prosopic index and the dominant type was the hypereuryprosopic type, which was dominant in Kanuri males (46.7%), Babur/Bura males (43%) and Babur/Bura females (40%, Table II).
The obtained prosopic indices showed that the hypereuryprosopic type of face shape was dominant in Kanuri males (46.7%), Babur/Bura males (43%) and Babur/ Bura females (40%), this results agrees with the findings of Mibodi & Frahani (1996) and Golalipour et al., 2003.