hyperechoic

hy·per·e·cho·ic

(hī'pĕr-e-kō'ik),
1. In ultrasonography, pertaining to material that produces echoes of higher amplitude or density than the surrounding medium.
2. Denoting a region in an ultrasound image in which the echoes are stronger than normal or than surrounding structures.

hyperechoic

adjective Referring to an abnormal increased in echoes by ultrasonography due to a pathologic change in tissue density.

hyperechoic

Imaging adjective Referring to an abnormal ↑ in echoes by ultrasonography, due to a pathologic change in tissue density. See Ultrasound.

hy·per·ech·o·ic

(hī'pĕr-ĕ-kō'ik)
1. Denoting a region in an ultrasound image in which the echoes are stronger than normal or than surrounding structures.
2. ultrasonography Pertaining to material that produces echoes of higher amplitude or density than the surrounding medium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Non-hereditary foetal hyperechoic kidneys can result from various causes such as an obstructive dysplasia, bilateral multicystic kidney disease, nephroblastomatosis, renal vein thrombosis, ischemia, infectious and metabolic diseases, nephrotic syndrome, and aneuploidy.
The bone presents as a hyperechoic structure that produces an anechoic shadow; the main bone structure in the airway is the hyoid bone, but in over fifty percent of the patients it cannot be fully visualized.
Sonographic evidence of an intraluminal mass with a hyperechoic arc-like surface and a marked acoustic shadow, suggestive of a bezoar, has been reported.
Sonographic breast anatomy can be divided into 3 categories based on the echogenicity of tissues: hyperechoic structures, medium echogenic structures and hypoechoic structures.[2,14]
Plain radiography did not give any appreciable diagnosis, but ultrasonography showed hyperechoic area with distal cast acoustic shadow, but was also obscured by even a small volume of luminal gas.
Among these diseases, we are familiar with hepatic steatosis, which presents increased diffuse echogenicity (DIVERS & COOPER, 2000; NYLAND et al., 2005; DUTRA, 2007; REDROBE, 2010), the deposition of uric acid in the kidneys and heart, which can be visualized as hyperechoic deposits (REDROBE, 2010), reproductive disorders, such as retention of eggs, which can be caused by cancer or granulomatous lesions in the reproductive system (FRYE, 1991), and the intake of foreign bodies, which may also occur in these animals and can be detected by ultrasound (PENNINCK, 2005).
Ultrasonography can show a solid, localized, noncompressible hyperechoic mass suggestive of inflammed fat;[sup][3] CT of the abdomen can show a characteristic whirling fatty and fibrous mass near a vascular pedicle, a spiral fatty mass with a whirling pattern, or a circumscribed fatty mass with hyperattenuated streaks and a concentric distribution of fibrous folds.[sup][2],[3] In this case, CT of the abdomen showed a whirling hyperattenuated streaks originating from the lesser omentum.
The rain artifact appears as a linear hyperechoic artifact covering the field of view.
A regular, well defined, hyperechoic lesion was usually benign.
The tibial nerve appears as a hyperechoic structure adjacent to the posterior tibial artery (Fig.