hyperconscious


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hyperconscious

(hī′pər-kŏn′shəs)
adj.
Highly or acutely aware.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather than continuing to create masculine representations that are devoid of politics as they did under dictatorship, they construct hyperconscious male political subjects in their texts, yet the discontent with the masculine figures mirrors the authors' discontent with the current political scene, especially since their idea of gender equality under a real democracy remains an ideal.
Even as the blacks seem to be both professionally and supernaturally empowered within the structure of the story, they are hyperconscious of being blacks in a white world and being victims of a white domination wherein even hope becomes suffering.
To be so hyperconscious of natural and human destruction depends upon a fine appreciation of what was once a part of reality but is so no longer.
It's something I deal with every day, and I am hyperconscious about it," Contactmusic quoted her as telling Harper's Bazaar.
Hyperconscious and emotionally exhausted, I decided to skip the rest of the conference and resigned to hiding in my hotel room.
The portrayal of his main characters, as well as of his fictional 'I', is however inescapably related to a cultural politics where the subject feels torn between the imperatives of a hyperconscious, obdurate "cogito" and the morally-laden, often guilt-ridden flights of the sympathetic imagination.
This volume should appeal to scholars with a solid knowledge of each author's works or, alternatively, to students of the symbolist period who hope to place these hyperconscious novelists of fin-de-siecle France in a generic category that they have, until now, eluded.
but has hit a mother lode in politically hyperconscious Berkeley, Calif.
Taken together, the expressive acting, the shift in the soundtrack from the melodramatic to a subjective point of hearing, and the overexposure of the film stock, all signal to the viewer that Lucia has become hyperconscious of her condition as an object within the hegemonic colonial and patriarchal order, or more precisely, as a means used by Rafael (Eduardo Moure) for the protection of that order.
Oedipa begins her journey by traveling to San Narciso, a city that exemplifies the hyperconscious textuality of Lot 49: "Like many named places in California it was less an identifiable city than a grouping of concepts--census tracts, special purpose bond-issue districts, shopping nuclei, all overlaid with access roads to its own freeway" (Lot 13).
And as he tries to think away the insult, he becomes more and more immobile and hyperconscious, as in the classic symptom for shame.