hypercementosis


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Related to hypercementosis: cementoblastoma, cementoma, condensing osteitis

hy·per·ce·men·to·sis

(hī'pĕr-sē'men-tō'sis),
Excessive deposition of secondary cementum on the root of a tooth, which may be caused by localized trauma or inflammation, excessive tooth eruption, or osteitis deformans, or may occur idiopathically.
[hyper- + L. caementum, a rough quarry stone, + -osis, condition]

hypercementosis

a non-neoplastic deposition of excessive cementum that is continuous with normal radicular cementum. Compare concrescence.

hy·per·ce·men·to·sis

(hī'pĕr-sē'mĕn-tō'sis)
Excessive deposition of secondary cementum on the root of a tooth, which may be caused by localized trauma or inflammation, excessive tooth eruption, or osteitis deformans, or may occur idiopathically.
[hyper- + L. caementum, a rough quarry stone, + -osis, condition]

hy·per·ce·men·to·sis

(hī'pĕr-sē'mĕn-tō'sis)
Excessive deposition of secondary cementum on tooth root, which may be caused by localized trauma or inflammation, excessive tooth eruption, or osteitis deformans, or may occur idiopathically.
Synonym(s): cementum hyperplasia, excementosis.
[hyper- + L. caementum, a rough quarry stone, + -osis, condition]

hypercementosis

abnormal thickening of the cement of the teeth; may affect a few or most of the teeth; often associated with inflammation of the dental root.
References in periodicals archive ?
7 The characteristic radiographic appearance of hypercementosis is thickening of the cementum layer along with blunting or rounding of the root tip with various expressions of the trait from mild to severe.
The purpose of this article is to report the successful nonsurgical endodontic management of mandibular first premolar with unusual anatomy and hypercementosis which is not reported elsewhere before.
Interestingly the unique pattern of the canal system (Fig 1) was found which resembled configuration of Vertucci type V 9 and hypercementosis at the apex of the tooth.
This case report illustrates unusual morphology of the roots and root canal systems of a mandibular premolar with hypercementosis in an adolescent patient.
The prevalence of hypercementosis of teeth is not well established and the available data in the current literature range from 1.
Still, if any treatment procedure for diseased teeth, associated additionally with hypercementosis are indicated, these may present problems for various reasons.
Therefore, it is stated that, clinically hypercementosis may directly influence on root canal treatment because the clinician needs to know the limits for root canal shaping and filling.
Similarly Pinheiro et al20 stated that most of root apexes of teeth presenting mild and diffuse hypercementosis did not show irregularities and resorption, but they had a greater number of foramina.
Early hypercementosis and arrested dental eruption: heritable multiple ankylodontia.