hypercapnia

(redirected from hypercapnic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

hy·per·cap·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-kap'nē-ă),
Abnormally increased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypercarbia
[hyper- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypercapnia

(hī′pər-kăp′nē-ə)
n.
1. An abnormally high concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood, usually caused by acute respiratory failure from conditions such as asthma and obstructive pulmonary disease. It can lead to seizures and death if acute and untreated.
2. Carbon dioxide poisoning due to abnormally high concentrations of carbon dioxide in an organism's environment.

hypercapnia

↑ CO2 in blood. See Permissive hypercapnia.

hy·per·cap·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-kap'nē-ă)
Abnormally increased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypercarbia.
[hyper- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypercapnia

A higher than normal level of carbon dioxide in the blood. This suggests that ventilation in the air sacs of the lungs (alveoli) is inadequate possibly because the sensitivity of the respiratory centre to raised CO2 levels has been affected. In health, hypercapnia always causes an increased rate and depth of breathing.

hypercapnia

The presence of a raised carbon dioxide content or tension in a milieu (e.g. blood, tears). Contact lens wear tends to give rise to this condition, especially lenses of low gas transmissibility. See acidosis.

hy·per·cap·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-kap'nē-ă)
Abnormally increased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
[hyper- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]
References in periodicals archive ?
In resource poor settings, the use of BiPAP through endotracheal tube can be an effective and safe intervention for comatose COPD patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure.
Attenuation of hypercapnic carbon dioxide chemo-sensitivity after postinfarction exercise training: possible contribution to the improvement in exercise hyperventilation.
In conclusion, this preliminary study provides original information regarding the relationship between NIV and inflammatory response in patients with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure.
(1982) Hypercapnic ventilation during exercise: effects of exercise methods and inhalation techniques.
Our investigation shows that after 14 days of hypercapnic exposure (pH 7.5 and 7.0), the concentration of chloride ion in the hemolymph of Saduria entomon remains unchanged and was at higher levels than in the medium, which is typical for hyperosmotic regulators (Hagerman & Szaniawska 1991).
Although the use of continuous NIV for the treatment of hypercapnic respiratory failure and cardiogenic pulmonary edema is supported by high level evidence, (42), (43) the delineation of roles regarding clinical decision making and application of the apparatus between nursing, medicine, and physiotherapy varies greatly in Australia.
Thus, oxygen may improve CSA by the suppression of the hypercapnic and the hypoxic ventilatory drives.
The exact mechanism resulting in alveolar hypoventilation in COPD patients is not uniformly accepted and this could be due to the type of measurements used, the stage of sleep (REM vs NREM), and whether the studies were performed in normocapnic or hypercapnic COPD patients.
Three types of disorders can lead to acute hypercapnic respiratory failure:
Active cycle of breathing techniques in noninvasive ventilation for acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.