hypercapnia


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hy·per·cap·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-kap'nē-ă),
Abnormally increased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypercarbia
[hyper- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypercapnia

/hy·per·cap·nia/ (-kap´ne-ah) excessive carbon dioxide in the blood.hypercap´nic

hypercapnia

(hī′pər-kăp′nē-ə)
n.
1. An abnormally high concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood, usually caused by acute respiratory failure from conditions such as asthma and obstructive pulmonary disease. It can lead to seizures and death if acute and untreated.
2. Carbon dioxide poisoning due to abnormally high concentrations of carbon dioxide in an organism's environment.

hypercapnia

[hī′pərkap′nē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, hyper + kapnos, vapor
greater than normal amounts of carbon dioxide in the blood. Also called hypercarbia.

hypercapnia

↑ CO2 in blood. See Permissive hypercapnia.

hy·per·cap·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-kap'nē-ă)
Abnormally increased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypercarbia.
[hyper- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypercapnia

A higher than normal level of carbon dioxide in the blood. This suggests that ventilation in the air sacs of the lungs (alveoli) is inadequate possibly because the sensitivity of the respiratory centre to raised CO2 levels has been affected. In health, hypercapnia always causes an increased rate and depth of breathing.

hypercapnia

The presence of a raised carbon dioxide content or tension in a milieu (e.g. blood, tears). Contact lens wear tends to give rise to this condition, especially lenses of low gas transmissibility. See acidosis.

hy·per·cap·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-kap'nē-ă)
Abnormally increased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
[hyper- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypercapnia, hypercarbia

excess of carbon dioxide in the blood, indicated by an elevated Pco2 as determined by blood gas analysis, and resulting in respiratory acidosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
E]ntilatory responses to hypercapnia in divers and non-divers: effects of posture and immersion.
Effects of hypercapnia on blood acid--base status, NaCl fluxes, and trans-gill potential in freshwater blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus.
Low mortality associated with low volume pressure limited ventilation with permissive hypercapnia in severe adult respiratory distress syndrome.
Frequent arousals and awakenings generally associated with the hypercapnia after an apnoea can lead to disruption of the normal distribution of sleep stages (75).
10,24] Severe hypercapnia or hypoxia produce an increase in ICP waveform amplitude and rounding of the waveform as ICP increases.
Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate the diagnostic value of pulse oximetry in detecting acidosis, hypercapnia, hypoxemia, and hyperoxemia.
Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea have high levels of sympathetic nerve traffic, caused by chemoreceptor reflexes triggered by repetitive episodes of hypoxia, hypercapnia and obstructive apnea.
Locomotory fatigue during moderate and severe hypoxia and hypercapnia in the Atlantic blue crab.
Respiratory responses of the salt march animals, Fundulus heteroclitus, Leiostomus xanthurus, and Palaemonetes pugio to environmental hypoxia and hypercapnia and to the organophosphate pesticide, azinphos methyl.
Reduction in the respiratory rate, or, more especially, in the tidal volume of each breath may lead to hypoxaemia, but more importantly is likely to cause hypercapnia.