hypercapnia


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hy·per·cap·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-kap'nē-ă),
Abnormally increased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypercarbia
[hyper- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hypercapnia

(hī′pər-kăp′nē-ə)
n.
1. An abnormally high concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood, usually caused by acute respiratory failure from conditions such as asthma and obstructive pulmonary disease. It can lead to seizures and death if acute and untreated.
2. Carbon dioxide poisoning due to abnormally high concentrations of carbon dioxide in an organism's environment.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

hypercapnia

↑ CO2 in blood. See Permissive hypercapnia.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hy·per·cap·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-kap'nē-ă)
Abnormally increased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypercarbia.
[hyper- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hypercapnia

A higher than normal level of carbon dioxide in the blood. This suggests that ventilation in the air sacs of the lungs (alveoli) is inadequate possibly because the sensitivity of the respiratory centre to raised CO2 levels has been affected. In health, hypercapnia always causes an increased rate and depth of breathing.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

hypercapnia

The presence of a raised carbon dioxide content or tension in a milieu (e.g. blood, tears). Contact lens wear tends to give rise to this condition, especially lenses of low gas transmissibility. See acidosis.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

hy·per·cap·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-kap'nē-ă)
Abnormally increased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
[hyper- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Qualitative values like gender, size of tube, surgery performed, frequency of malposition, migration, hypoxia and hypercapnia were represented as frequency and percentage.
Previous studies have shown that salvinorin A preserved cerebrovascular autoregulation to hypotension and hypercapnia after brain hypoxia/ischemia via ERK/MAPK in a piglet model (9,10).
Regardless, hypercapnia is a recognised limitation of THRIVE and a valid concern especially when applied to obese patients.
However, during sleep, this voluntary response dissipates resulting in hypoventilation, hypercapnia, and hypoxemia [9].
Effects of hypercapnia on blood acid-base status, NaCl fluxes, and trans-gill potential in freshwater blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus.
When we began to monitor patients' breathing during sleep, we were truly surprised at the irregularity of breathing with severe hypoxemia with or without hypercapnia during sleep and that their blood gases worsened greatly compared to awake levels (Figs.
Choroidal blood-flow responses to hyperoxia and hypercapnia in men with obstructive sleep apnea.
The data is challenged by other studies postulating that the inhibition of AE or carbonic anhydrase decreases pulmonary vascular tone during hypercapnia. (12) Furthermore, 400 [micro]M of DIDS extends the acute phase of HPV in the isolated rabbit lung whereas DIDS 200 [micro]M has no effect on pulmonary artery pressure compared to the control hypoxic group during 60 minutes of the experiments.
The cavernous blood gases (Table 1) showed hypoxia, hypercapnia, and acidosis which confirmed the diagnosis of ischaemic priapism.
Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a diagnosis of exclusion and should be distinguished from other conditions that are commonly associated with hypercapnia (1).
She experienced ocular muscle weakness and worsening respiratory effort resulting in hypoxia and hypercapnia. She initially responded well to NIPPV and IVIG therapy but eventually required intubation and mechanical ventilation due to worsening respiratory acidosis.