hyperbaric oxygen therapy


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hy·per·bar·ic ox·y·gen ther·a·py

treatment in which oxygen is provided in a sealed chamber at an ambient pressure greater than 1 atmosphere.
See also: hyperbaric oxygenation.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Administration of O2 in a chamber at > sea-level atmospheric pressure, which increases O2 dissolved in the blood from 1.5g/dL to 6.0 g/dL and O2 tension in tissues to nearly 400 mm Hg; this excess of O2 has various biochemical, cellular, physiologic benefits
Complications Barotrauma—air embolism, pneumothorax, tympanic membrane damage, O2 toxicity—CNS, pulmonary, reversible visual changes, fire or explosion and claustrophobia
Emergency medicine HOT is used for decompression sickness, gas embolism, extreme blood loss anemia, and as adjunctive therapy for clostridial myonecrosis and gangrene—associated with acute tissue hypoxia, crush injury, suturing of severed limbs. HOT is also used in smoke inhalation, cyanide intoxication, acute carbon monoxide poisoning, traumatic ischemia—as in compartment syndrome(s)—to enhance healing of recalcitrant or necrotic wounds, compromised skin grafts and flaps, chronic osteomyelitis, actinomycosis, and to prevent osteoradionecrosis
Fringe medicine HOT has been advocated by some alternative health care providers as an ‘oxidative’ therapy for ageing, grey hair, AIDS, alcohol and drug addiction, multiple sclerosis, stroke, vascular problems, and other conditions
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

hyperbaric oxygen therapy

The administration of O2 in a chamber at > sea-level atmospheric pressure, which ↑ O2 dissolved in the blood from 1.5g/dL to 6.0 g/dL and O2 tension in tissues to nearly 400 mm Hg; this surfeit of O2 has various biochemical, cellular, physiologic benefits Emergency medicine HOT is used in decompression sickness, in gas embolism, extreme blood loss anemia, and as adjunctive therapy for clostridial myonecrosis and gangrene, crush injury and compromised skin grafts and flaps, suturing of severed limbs, and in preventing osteoradionecrosis Mainstream medicine HOT is also used in smoke inhalation, cyanide intoxication, acute carbon monoxide poisoning, extreme blood loss anemia, traumatic ischemia, as in compartment syndrome(s) and crush injury, to enhance healing of recalcitrant or necrotic wounds, as an adjunct therapy for clostridial myonecrosis–associated with acute tissue hypoxia, compromised skin grafts and flaps, chronic osteomyelitis, actinomycosis. and to prevent osteoradionecrosis Complications Barotrauma–air embolism, pneumothorax, tympanic membrane damage, O2 toxicity–CNS, pulmonary, reversible visual changes, fire or explosion and claustrophobia
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hy·per·bar·ic ox·y·gen ther·a·py

(hī'pĕr-bar'ik ok'si-jĕn thār'ă-pē)
Treatment in which oxygen is provided in a sealed chamber at an ambient pressure greater than 1 atmosphere.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO)

A treatment in which the patient is placed in a chamber and breathes oxygen at higher-than-atmospheric pressure. This high-pressure oxygen stops bacteria from growing and, at high enough pressure, kills them.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A prospective randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa.
When treatment methods were examined based on the audiogram types and the times from onset to treatment, oral medical treatment + hyperbaric oxygen therapy was found to have achieved the highest success in all audiogram types after week 2.
Wang et al., "Efficacy of n-butylphthalide and hyperbaric oxygen therapy on cognitive dysfunction in patients with delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning," Medical Science Monitor, vol.
Kranke, "Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for acute ischaemic stroke," Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, vol.
Flood, "Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for diabetic Foot Ulcers," The Journal of Lancaster General Hospital, pp.
Financial margins in wound care clinics can be tight, and the need to remain profitable has at times resulted in patients being treated inappropriately with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (Adv Skin Wound Care.
A phase I study of low-pressure hyperbaric oxygen therapy for blast-induced post-concussion syndrome and post-traumatic stress disorder.
He went from something always bothering him to, after hyperbaric oxygen therapy, being content, happy and relaxed.
Fifty-two patients (21.7%), who had high blood COHb levels (>25%) and cardiovascular or neurological symptoms, such as altered mental status, seizures, or fainting, received hyperbaric oxygen therapy. A 5-year-old patient died within 24 h after a fire.
However, a large retrospective analysis of necrotizing soft tissue infections found no improvement in mortality or amputation rates with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. (7) The biological basis for the use of hyperbaric oxygen in infected tissue is that it leads to an increase oxygen concentration in plasma, providing higher oxygen partial pressure, induces lymphocyte apoptosis for bacterial killing.
Their topics include breast augmentation, eyelid reconstruction, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, microorganisms and antibiotics, pre-malignant lesions, and vacuum wound closure.