hyperbaric


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hyperbaric

 [hi″per-bar´ik]
characterized by greater than normal pressure or weight; applied to gases under greater than atmospheric pressure, or to a solution of greater specific gravity than another taken as a standard of reference.
hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) exposure to oxygen under pressure greater than normal atmospheric pressure. This treatment is given to patients who, for various reasons, need more oxygen than they can take in by breathing in the normal atmosphere or using an oxygen mask. Called also high pressure oxygenation.

The patient is placed in a sealed enclosure called a hyperbaric chamber. Compressed air is introduced to raise the atmospheric pressure to several times normal. At the same time the patient is given pure oxygen through a face mask. The increase in atmospheric pressure forces enough air into the patient so that the pressure within the body equals that in the hyperbaric chamber. Thus all the tissues become flooded with more than the usual supply of oxygen. While the patient is in the chamber, pressure changes are controlled with extreme care to avoid injury to the lungs or other tissues.
Use of Hyperbaric Oxygenation. This treatment may be administered in many types of disorders in which oxygen supply is deficient. If, because of injury or disease, the heart or lungs are unable to maintain good circulation and oxygenation, the increase in oxygen can temporarily compensate for this reduction. If injury or disease has caused the breaking or blocking of arteries, an extra supply of oxygen in the vessels that are still functioning will help.

Decompression sickness related to diving is one of the most common uses for hyberbaric oxygen therapy. The effectiveness of this therapy has also been demonstrated for treatment of arterial gas emboli, treatment and prevention of bone damage caused by radiation therapy, and treatment of clostridial myonecrosis. It is also sometimes used to promote healing in skin grafts.

Carbon monoxide poisoning can also be treated by hyperbaric oxygenation. Carbon monoxide, displacing the oxygen from hemoglobin, usually causes asphyxiation, but hyperbaric oxygenation can often keep patients alive until the carbon monoxide has been eliminated from the body.

Claims have been advanced about the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygenation for a wide variety of disorders and diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, and arthritis. To date, there have been no randomized clinical trials supporting such uses.

hy·per·bar·ic

(hī'pĕr-băr'ik),
1. Pertaining to pressure of ambient gases greater than one atmosphere.
2. Concerning solutions, more dense than the diluent or medium; for example, in spinal anesthesia, a hyperbaric solution has a density greater than that of spinal fluid.
[hyper- + G. baros, weight]

hyperbaric

/hy·per·bar·ic/ (-bar´ik) having greater than normal pressure or weight; said of gases under greater than atmospheric pressure, or of a solution of greater specific gravity than another used as a reference standard.

hyperbaric

(hī′pər-băr′ĭk)
adj.
Of, relating to, producing, operating, or occurring at pressures higher than normal atmospheric pressure: a hyperbaric chamber.

hy′per·bar′i·cal·ly adv.

hy·per·bar·ic

(hī'pĕr-bar'ik)
1. Pertaining to pressure of ambient gases exceeding 1 atmosphere.
2. Concerning solutions, more dense than the diluent or medium; e.g., in spinal anesthesia, a hyperbaric solution has a density greater than that of spinal fluid.
[hyper- + G. baros, weight]

hy·per·bar·ic

(hī'pĕr-bar'ik)
Concerning solutions, those that are denser than the diluent or medium; e.g., in spinal anesthesia, a hyperbaric solution has a density greater than that of spinal fluid.
[hyper- + G. baros, weight]

hyperbaric

characterized by greater than normal pressure or weight; applied to gases under greater than atmospheric pressure, or to a solution of greater specific gravity than another taken as a standard of reference.

hyperbaric oxygenation
exposure to oxygen under conditions of greatly increased pressure; abbreviated HPO, for high-pressure oxygenation. This treatment is given to patients who, for various reasons, need more oxygen than they can take in by breathing while in the ordinary atmosphere, or even in an oxygen tent.
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