hyperamylasemia


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hyperamylasemia

 [hi″per-am″il-a-se´me-ah]
abnormally high levels of amylase in the blood serum.

hy·per·am·y·la·se·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-am'i-lā-sē'mē-ă),
Elevated serum amylase, usually seen as one of the manifestations of acute pancreatitis.
[hyper- + amylase, + G. haima, blood]

hy·per·am·y·la·se·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-am'i-lā-sē'mē-ă)
Elevated serum amylase, usually seen as one of the manifestations of acute pancreatitis.
Synonym(s): hyperamylasaemia.
[hyper- + amylase, + G. haima, blood]
References in periodicals archive ?
Our study reported 75% of the patients developed hyperamylasemia which was more than double the percentage reported by Leghari et al (32.4%)6.
We found that patients with hyperamylasemia regardless of the disease also had increased risks for hospitalization and for having surgery.
Four months after her hospital admission, she had a second episode of pancreatitis (hyperamylasemia of 1819 U/L).
The patient had no complaints but persisting hyperamylasemia (450 U/L) and normal lipase activity at the follow-up outpatient visit three months later.
It consists of bowel rest with nasogastric drainage and total parenteral nutrition, serial abdominal examination, and serial serum amylase determination with laparotomy or further imaging studies performed for worsening abdominal examination or persistent hyperamylasemia. However, nonoperative management in the setting of main pancreatic ductal injury leads to a high incidence of late complications, in particular pseudocysts and pancreatic fistula.
Moreover, epigastric pain and hyperamylasemia were the only criterion used for establishing a diagnosis of PEP.
Thus hyperamylasemia is a highly sensitive but not specific marker of disease.
(10) and Boulanger, but is in conflict with the findings of Farkouh, whose work suggested that a hyperamylasemia may indicate the presence of a serious intra-abdominal lesion.
Patients with Haemosuccus Pancreaticus usually present with the triad of abdominal pain, mostly epigastric radiating to the back, GI bleeding and hyperamylasemia.3
[2] Hyperamylasemia is seen within 24 hours of onset of attack and returns to normal within 7 days.
Hyperamylasemia following lipid resuscitation: pancreas or parotid?