hyperacusis


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Related to hyperacusis: misophonia

hyperacusis

 [hi″per-ah-ku´sis]
abnormal acuteness of the sense of hearing.

hy·per·a·cu·sis

, hyperacusia (hī'pĕr-ă-kū'sis, -kū'sē-ă),
Heightened sensitivity to sound, with aversive or pained reactions to normal environmental sounds.
See also: decreased sound tolerance, misophonia, phonophobia.

hyperacusis

/hy·per·acu·sis/ (-ah-koo´sis) an exceptionally acute sense of hearing, the threshold being very low.

hyperacusis

(hī′pər-ə-ko͞o′sĭs, -kyo͞o′-)
n.
Abnormally acute hearing due to heightened irritability of the sensory neural mechanism.

hyperacusis

ENT A marked ↑ in sensitivity to sounds

hy·per·a·cu·sis

, hyperacusia (hi'pĕr-ă-kyū'sis, -kyū'sē-ă)
Heightened auditory acuity, sometimes accompanied by painful sensitivity to ordinary environmental sounds. usage note The term is not synonymous with recruitment or hypersensitivity.
[hyper- + G. akousis, hearing]

hyperacusis

Undue sensitivity to sound which is perceived as uncomfortably loud, so that normal sound levels may be found intolerable. Also known as recruitment. These are features of various conditions including many cases of SENSORINEURAL DEAFNESS and of BELL'S PALSY. Hyperacusis should be distinguished from phonophobia (fear of sound) and misophonia (dislike of sound).
References in periodicals archive ?
MG reported that his left facial symptoms came on suddenly with mild pain, markedly decreased sensation in the left face, decreased production of tears but without otalgia, altered taste, hyperacusis or aural fullness.
People with hyperacusis have such a severe intolerance to sound, that it may be difficult and sometimes impossible for them to remain in the mainstream of life enduring all the environmental noise which comes with living in our world today.
Participants usually reported that other people regarded them as having at least one or more disabling conditions and one or two were mentioned by each participant, including heart problems, high blood pressure, lazy eye, the habit of walking differently from others, inability to run fast, problems with balance, poor depth perception, rocking, hyperacusis, epileptic seizures, negative reactions to smoke, and needing to sleep with a natural noise machine.
Stephanie Blayney, 14, suffers from autism and the rare condition hyperacusis, which means everyday sounds including children's voices and traffic can inflict agony.
Note: Tinnitus is often associated with the inability to tolerate loud sounds, or hyperacusis.
From hyperacusis, an over-sensitivity to certain frequency ranges of sound, to misophonia, literally a "hatred of sound", the research could explain a whole host of conditions.
A better understanding of the brain's reaction to noise could help our understanding of medical conditions with which people have a decreased sound tolerance, such as hyperacusis, misophonia (literally "hatred of sound") and autism.
TBI-V-10 Headache, slight blur, intermittent diplopia (near and far), trouble focusing at near, dry eye, hyperacusis, photosensitivity, frequent nausea, eyestrain.
Such involvement can lead to pulsatile tinnitus, progressive hearing loss, significant otorrhagia via the eustachiantube, and/or vertigo, hyperacusis, and eustachian tube dysfunction.
Prolonged exposure to these high levels of sound can result in serious long-term harm, including conditions such as tinnitus, vestibular disturbance and hyperacusis (sensitivity to everyday sounds).
Depression and anxiety can About 10 the high-tone in failed to It became also be tinnitus triggers, as can other hearing conditions like Meniere's disease and hyperacusis.
eye, lost olfaction, hyperacusis, photosen- sitivity, frequent nau- sea, & eyestrain.