minimal brain dysfunction

(redirected from hyperactive child)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to hyperactive child: hyperactive child syndrome

dysfunction

 [dis-fungk´shun]
disturbance, impairment, or abnormality of functioning of an organ. adj., adj dysfunc´tional.
erectile dysfunction impotence.
minimal brain dysfunction former name for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.
risk for peripheral neurovascular dysfunction a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for disruption in circulation, sensation, or motion of an extremity or limb.
sexual dysfunction see sexual dysfunction.

at·ten·tion def·i·cit dis·or·der (ADD),

a disorder of attention, organization and impulse control appearing in childhood and often persisting to adulthood. Hyperactivity may be a feature but is not necessary for the diagnosis.

minimal brain dysfunction

n.
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. No longer in scientific use.

minimal brain dysfunction

minimal brain dysfunction

A term used in the 1960s for children with learning problems of presumed neurological basis, which has been largely replaced by the term attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

minimal brain dysfunction

Hyperactive child, hyperkinetic child syndrome, hyperkinetic syndrome, minimal brain damage, minimal cerebral dysfunction Neurology A term used in the 1960s for children with learning problems of implied neurological basis. See ADD.

min·i·mal brain dys·func·tion

(MBD) (min'i-măl brān dis-fŭngk'shŭn)
Mild to severe learning behavioral disabilities in people with average or above average intelligence.
See: attention deficit disorder
References in periodicals archive ?
Parents, teachers and physicians must work as a team to diagnose, treat and cope with the hyperactive child.
The hyperactive child finds it difficult to focus attention on his favorite television show or even a toy.
For reasons that are not clearly understood, in a genuinely hyperactive child, there is a paradoxical effect.
Children's symptoms may result from their parents' difficulties, or the parents' symptoms may be due to the stress and frustration of dealing with a hyperactive child.
It's understandable that a parent of a hyperactive child might be hypersensitive to the child's sleep difficulties after keeping up with that child all day without even the respite that a nap would provide.
A hyperactive child can be exhausting and frustrating.
If you have a hyperactive child, you might have to agree to your child taking powerful and potentially harmful drugs, like Ritalin, before they are accepted into a school.
It's like watching a hyperactive child trying to tell you the world's unfunniest joke.
A GET it out of your head that you have to "tame" a hyperactive child.
More information is available in the book, Hyperactive Child by Belinda Barnes and Irene Colquhoun (Thorsons pounds 5.
Later, Margaret challenges an aggressive woman's approach to disciplining her hyperactive child, resulting in a near punch-up.
There is an alarmingly long list of other culprits that could be to blame for sending the hyperactive child into a frenzy.