hyperabduction

su·per·ab·duc·tion

(sū'pĕr-ab-dŭk'shŭn),
Abduction of a limb beyond the normal limit.
Synonym(s): hyperabduction

hyperabduction

(soo″pĕr-ăb-dŭk′shŭn) [L. super, over, above, + abducens, drawing away]
Pronounced or extreme abduction.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the 15-letter plural of the noun HYPERABDUCTION, more of which later in this article.
External rotation greater than 90[degrees] at the side is suggestive of anterior ligamentous hyperlaxity; asymmetrical hyperabduction of more than 20[degrees] compared to the contralateral arm is indicative of a stretched inferior glenohumeral ligament.
Pectoralis minor tenotomy and anterior scalenotomy with special reference to the hyperabduction syndrome and " effort thrombosis" of the subclavian vein.
The thrombosis is caused by trauma or repetitive muscular activity involving abduction or hyperabduction of the upper extremity.
During VA monitoring, we compared the results for five shoulder postures: Usual and opposite positions (sitting and lying), and during provocative shoulder postures, including hyperabduction (hand high); Roos ("stick em up") and Adson's test ("military posture").
3) Hyperabduction (4) Roos [DELTA]< 50% [DELTA] p [DELTA] [DELTA] p [greater value < 50% [greater value than or than or equal to] equal to] 50% 50% N 29 15 35 11 Baseline 1260 1850 0.
Previously, the name was designated according to the etiologies of compression, such as scalenus anticus, costoclavicular, hyperabduction, cervical rib, or first rib syndromes.
Wright (14) described the hyperabduction syndrome with compression in the costoclavicular area by the tendon of the pectoralis minor.
This injury is usually associated with a high energy trauma and is due to hyperabduction and external rotation of the arm with retraction of the scapula.
The mechanism involves severe hyperabduction and external rotation of the arm combined with scapular retraction.
The proposed mechanism of injury is a hyperabduction and external rotation force versus a hyperabduction and impaction force which would result in a Bankart lesion.
Multiple positional etiologies have been proposed, including hyperabduction and a combination of flexion, adduction, and internal rotation.