hyoid

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Related to hyoids: Lingual bone

hyoid

 [hi´oid]
1. shaped like a U.
2. pertaining to the hyoid bone; see Appendix 3-3.

hy·oid

(hī'oyd),
U-shaped or V-shaped; denoting the hyoid bone and the hyoid apparatus. See: hyoid bone.
[G. hyoeidēs, shaped like the letter upsilon, Υ]

hyoid

/hy·oid/ (hi´oid) shaped like Greek letter upsilon (υ); pertaining to the hyoid bone.

hyoid

(hī′oid′)
adj.
Of or relating to the hyoid bone.
n.
The hyoid bone.

hyoid

[hī′oid]
Etymology: Gk, hyoeides, upsilon, U-shaped
1 n, the hyoid bone.
2 adj, pertaining to the hyoid bone.

hy·oid

(hī'oyd)
U-shaped or V-shaped; denoting the os hyoideum and the apparatus hyoideus.
[G. hyoeidēs, shaped like the letter upsilon, υ]

hyo-

or

hyoid

prefix denoting Y-shaped.

hyoid

1. shaped like Greek letter upsilon (υ).
2. pertaining to the hyoid bone.

hyoid apparatus
the suspensory mechanism for the tongue and larynx. Consists of the single basihyoid, and the paired thyrohyoid, ceratohyoid, epihyoid and stylohyoid bones and the tympanohyoid cartilages.
hyoid bone
one or more of the bones of the hyoid apparatus, fused in some species (e.g. human) to form a horseshoe-shaped bone situated at the base of the tongue, just below the thyroid cartilage. See also Table 10.
References in periodicals archive ?
Considerable variation in hyoid shape appeared, both among species and among individuals in the same species, Reidenberg says.
The Neandertal hyoid is "indistinguishable" from those of modern humans, Frayer contends.
The shape and size of the Neanderthal hyoid bone and the positioning of marks left by muscle attachments closely resemble those observed in modern humans, the investigators say.
You can't reproduce the position of the entire vocal tract [the top half of the airway linking the lungs to the atmosphere] with just a hyoid bone and a jaw fragment," says anatomist Jeffrey T.
Falk's reconstruction of the larynx and hyoid position in the same specimen analyzed by Lieberman, described in the July 1975 AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY, indicates Neanderthals could produce the full range of speech sounds.