hygiene hypothesis


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The theory that the clean modern lifestyle and lack of early childhood exposure to dirt, bacteria and other pathogens weaken the immune system, and increase susceptibility to allergies and asthma

hygiene hypothesis

Allergy medicine The theory that a clean modern lifestyle alters the immune system, ↑ susceptibility to allergies. See Leipzig disparity.

hy·giene hy·poth·e·sis

(hī'jēn hī-poth'ĕ-sis)
The tenet that improved cleanliness and modern medical care may be lowering the ability of people to deal with otherwise nonlethal pathogens and disease.
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Participants in the Hygiene in the Home Study were also asked about the hygiene hypothesis. While support for the theory appears to vary significantly from country to country, overall a reassuring 43% do not believe in the notion at all, 24% thought there might be some truth in it, with 8% not sure.
Participants in the Hygiene in the Home Study were also asked about the hygiene hypothesis. While support for the theory appears to vary significantly from country to country, overall a reassuring 43 per cent do not believe in the notion at all, 24 per cent thought there might be some truth in it, with 8 per cent not sure.
The so-called Hygiene Hypothesis is the most widely accepted hypothesis that explains the allergic march of the past couple of decades.
The second conspiratorial suggestion is that there has been inadequate investigation of the "hygiene hypothesis" - the idea that exposure to small amounts of bacteria in milk can strengthen the immune system.
One theory explains that fact by the hygiene hypothesis, which suggests an altered exposure to microbes in the environment, due to improved sanitation and personal hygiene, smaller family sizes, shorter duration of breastfeeding, immunizations and lack of serious childhood infections results in alteration of immunoregulation (24,32,34).
There are different theories explaining this phenomenon: a hygiene hypothesis by David P.
It is based on the "hygiene hypothesis." Both autoimmune diseases, such as MS, and allergies are less common in the developing world, possibly because early exposure to common infectious agents--such as occurs to people in regions with poor sanitation--may stimulate immune regulation in a positive way and aid healthy immune responses.
International experts in this field examine topics including how children and families cope with the disease, contributing environmental factors (e.g., support for the hygiene hypothesis), aspirin as a trigger for some patients, and the validity of the Standardized Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire.
Under a school of thought called the hygiene hypothesis, children who grow up in squeaky clean environments have more asthma and allergies than do kids raised in contact with farm animals or in other less sanitary conditions.
The unexpected (from the hygiene hypothesis perspective) greater prevalence among those with lower SES could be an artefact reflecting differences not in the prevalence of asthma but in the prevalence of severe asthma, with severe disease being more likely to be diagnosed.
One is the hygiene hypothesis: A robust body of research shows that infants benefit from gut microbes (filth, in other words), which inoculate the immune system and prevent the overreaction that is allergy.