crystal

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Related to hydroxyapatite crystal: Calcium hydroxyapatite

crystal

 [kris´t'l]
a homogeneous angular solid of definite form, with systematically arranged elemental units.
hydroxyapatite crystal microscopic crystals of hydroxyapatite occurring in joints or bursae in a variety of connective tissue disorders.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

crys·tal

(kris'tăl),
A solid of regular shape and, for a given compound, characteristic angles, formed when an element or compound solidifies slowly enough, as a result either of freezing from the liquid form or of precipitating out of solution, to allow the individual molecules to take up regular positions with respect to one another.
[G. krystallos, clear ice, crystal]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

crystal

Drug slang A popular term for a crystallized form of methamphetamine; PCP; amphetamine; cocaine Urology Kidney stone, see there Vox populi A formed structure, often composed of a single type of material, which has a characteristic appearance by LM. See Birefringent crystal, Calcium oxalate crystal, Charcot-Leyden crystal, Coffin lid crystal, Hemoglobin C crystal, Jackstraw crystal, Lead crystal, Parking lot crystal, Piezoelectric crystal, Reinke crystal, Rhomboid crystal, Space crystal, Uric acid crystal, Washington monument crystal.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

crys·tal

(kris'tăl)
A solid of regular shape and, for any given compound, characteristic angles, formed when an element or compound solidifies slowly enough, as a result either of freezing from the liquid form or of precipitating out of solution, to allow the individual molecules to take up regular positions with respect to one another; can be seen in body fluids.
[G. krystallos, clear ice, crystal]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

crys·tal

(kris'tăl)
A solid of regular shape and, for a given compound, characteristic angles, formed when an element or compound solidifies slowly enough, as a result either of freezing from the liquid form or of precipitating out of solution, to allow the individual molecules to take up regular positions with respect to one another.
[G. krystallos, clear ice, crystal]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study, mineralization under serumfree conditions exhibited lower carbonate to phosphate levels and smaller hydroxyapatite crystals. Larger mineral crystals indicating higher mineralization capacity were found under serum-containing osteogenic differentiation.
Greater presence of hydroxyapatite crystals was observed when the cements were associated with nanoparticulate Zr[O.sub.2].
The 131 peer-reviewed papers consider such aspects as the growth of hydroxyapatite crystals on Bombyx mori silk fibroin, the conventional testing and evaluation of woven fabric's elasticity and wrinkle resistance, the crystal analysis of the chrysalis silk production provinces in China, the manufacture of reinforced thermoplastic composites with high fiber volume fraction, Suzhou embroidery and the innovative design of modern silk scarves, and the influence of cushion material on the pressure distribution based on the young female sitting posture.
Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis is an inflammatory condition caused by deposition of [Ca.sup.++] hydroxyapatite crystals in the superior oblique tendon fibers of the longus colli muscle.
XRD characterization results with the nanopowder production method using High Energy Milling then simulated using Crystal Maker Software as shown in Figure 2, shows that the peakfound is the peak of hydroxyapatite crystals, and no other crystalline phases were detected.
The first is a rapidly exchangeable form that associates with surfaces of the hydroxyapatite crystals of the mineralized component of bone.
The wavelength of these lasers is well absorbed by water molecules; therefore, irradiation with these lasers promotes water heating in the hydroxyapatite crystals, causing a sudden evaporation of water and microbursts in the interprismatic substance, removing hydroxyapatite crystals at a temperature below its melting point (~1,200[degrees]C).
Although the precise role of osteocalcin in bone mineralization remains obscure, it probably regulates the growth of hydroxyapatite crystals. Furthermore, vitamin K2 also inhibits the expression of the osteoclast differentiation factor (ODF)/RANK ligand, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity, and mononuclear cell formation, and induces osteoclast apoptosis in vitro.
Glimcher, Hydroxyapatite crystals as a local delivery system for cisplatin: adsorption and release of cisplatin in vitro, J.
Enamel comprises about 95% of substituted hydroxyapatite crystals, arranged in bundles of enamel prisms 2-5 microns in diameter extending from dentine to the enamel surface.
These threads then form a scaffolding on which the chief element of bone, the calcium-bearing hydroxyapatite crystals, grow.