bisulphide

(redirected from Hydrosulphide)
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bisulphide

A disulphide—i.e., with 2 atoms of sulphur, as in iron pyrites, FeS2.

bi·sul·fide

(bī-sŭl'fīd)
A compound of the anion HS-; an acid sulfide.
Synonym(s): bisulphide.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Alkaline oxidation of hydrosulphide was reported to yield as reaction products mainly zerovalent sulphur and thiosulphate (Petre and Larachi, 2006b, 2007).
Although the homogeneous oxidation of [H.sub.2]S by DO2 has been the subject of several studies (Chen and Morris, 1972; O'Brien and Birkner, 1977; Hoffmann and Lim, 1979; Steudel, 1996; Fischer et al., 1997), Herszage and dos Santos Afonso (2000) were the first who studied the heterogeneously-mediated reactions between an Fe-based oxide, hydrosulphide, and oxygen in the pH range [5-7].
Over the pH range [8-11], the hydrosulphide anoxic oxidation by FeCeOx was shown to yield polysulphides through disulphide Equation (1), possibly elemental sulphur, and thiosulphate (Petre and Larachi, 2007):
In oxic iron-free solutions, hydrosulphide is known to react homogeneously with DO2 to yield polysulphides, starting from disulphide, and oxysulphur products therefrom (Chen and Morris, 1972; Steudel, 1996):
The hydrosulphide homogeneous oxidation is pH-dependent and is relatively slow (Kotronarou and Hoffmann, 1991).
A simple and plausible oxidation pathway of hydrosulphide by FeCeOx/DO2 system will be set forth for the alkaline pH conditions investigated in this work.
A simple kinetic model depicting the early moments of the global oxic hydrosulphide degradation will be built based on the combined homogeneous-heterogeneous oxidation kinetics of hydrosulphide.
The authors also concluded that increasing Fe content in Fe/Ce oxide-hydroxide increased hydrosulphide conversion both in oxic and in anoxic environments and that the cerium oxide is believed to enhance electron transfer between the Fe(II) sites and DO2 (Petre and Larachi, 2008).
At one end of the scale cyanides can be effective at levels as low as 5 g/mt, while at the other consumption of sodium hydrosulphide or Nokes reagents in copper-molybdenum separations can be as high as 10 kg/mt.
There should be a ready market present in Peru for sodium sulphide as, among other uses, a feedstock for xanthate production, and for sodium hydrosulphide as a copper depressant in byproduct molybdenite circuits.
This circuit uses sodium hydrosulphide to depress the copper, and burner oil to collect and float the molybdenum.
This unusual process gives rise to hydrogen sulfide gas, which is now redissolved in the tailings stream, but the company is investigating the production of sodium sulphide, sodium hydrosulphide, and manganese salts as byproducts.