hydrogen peroxide


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hydrogen

 (H) [hi´dro-jen]
a chemical element, atomic number 1, atomic weight 1.00797. (See Appendix 6.) It exists as the mass 1 isotope (protium, or light or ordinary hydrogen), mass 2 isotope (deuterium, heavy hydrogen), and mass 3 isotope (tritium).
hydrogen cyanide an extremely poisonous colorless liquid or gas, HCN, a decomposition product of various naturally occurring glycosides and a common cause of cyanide poisoning. Inhalation of the gas can cause death within a minute. Called also hydrocyanic acid.
heavy hydrogen deuterium.
hydrogen ion concentration the degree of concentration of hydrogen ions (the acid element) in a solution. Its symbol is pH, and it expresses the degree to which a solution is acidic or alkaline. The pH range extends from 0 to 14, pH 7 being neutral, a pH of less than 7 indicating acidity, and one above 7 indicating alkalinity. See also acid-base balance.
hydrogen peroxide H2O2, an antiseptic with a mildly antibacterial action. A 3 per cent solution foams on touching skin or mucous membrane and appears to have a mechanical cleansing action.
hydrogen sulfide H2S, a poisonous gas with an offensive smell, released from decaying organic material, natural gas, petroleum, and sulfur deposits, and sometimes used as a chemical reagent.

hy·dro·gen pe·rox·ide

an unstable compound readily broken down to water and oxygen, a reaction catalyzed by various powdered metals and by the enzyme, catalase; a 3% solution is used as a mild antiseptic for skin and mucous membranes.

hydrogen peroxide

n.
A colorless, heavy, strongly oxidizing liquid, H2O2, capable of reacting explosively with combustibles and used principally in aqueous solution as a mild antiseptic, bleaching agent, oxidizing agent, and laboratory reagent.

hydrogen peroxide

a disinfectant and sterilizing agent without antiseptic properties because it is rapidly inactivated by enzymes in the skin. However, the frothing that occurs is beneficial since it loosens debris in wounds.

hy·dro·gen pe·rox·ide

(hīdrō-jen pĕr-oksīd)
Unstable compound readily broken down to water and oxygen, a reaction catalyzed by various powdered metals and by the enzyme, catalase.
Synonym(s): hydroperoxide.

hydrogen peroxide

A powerful oxidizing and antibacterial agent. It is formulated as a cream for external use on skin infections, ulcers and pressure sores. Brand names are Crystacide and Hioxyl.

Hydrogen peroxide

A colorless, unstable compound of hydrogen and oxygen (H2O2). An aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide is used as an antiseptic and bleaching agent.
Mentioned in: Ozone Therapy
hydrogen peroxide; H2O2; Hyoxyl oxidizing agent with mild astringent, antiseptic and keratolytic action; used topically to soften keratinous tissues (e.g. onychophosis), cleanse soft-tissue cavities of breakdown products and pus (e.g. paronychia, tissue breakdown underlying a corn on otherwise healthy tissue) or to diagnose the presence of pus (inferred by exuberant effervescence produced by its application)

hydrogen peroxide (hīˑ·dr·jin per·kˑ·sīd),

n compound (H2O
2) generally recognized in traditional medicine as an antiseptic and cleansing agent; used externally. Has been used by injection and IV for HIV and other infections.

antiseptic 

An agent that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria. This term is generally restricted to agents that are sufficiently non-toxic for superficial application to living tissues. These include the preservatives for eye drops and contact lens solutions. Examples of antiseptics are alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, chlorbutanol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, thimerosal (or thiomersalate). Other agents that are too toxic to be applied to living tissues are called disinfectants and are used to sterilize instruments and apparatus. See disinfection; ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid; neutralization; sterilization.

hy·dro·gen pe·rox·ide

(hīdrō-jen pĕr-oksīd)
Unstable compound readily broken down to water and oxygen used as a mild antiseptic for skin and mucous membranes.

hydrogen

a chemical element, atomic number 1, atomic weight 1.00797, symbol H. See Table 6. It exists as the mass 1 isotope (protium, or light or ordinary hydrogen), mass 2 isotope (deuterium, heavy hydrogen), and mass 3 isotope (tritium).

hydrogen bonding
weak electrostatic attraction between one electronegative atom and the hydrogen atom covalently linked to a second electronegative atom.
hydrogen breath test
detects hydrogen production as a product of bacterial fermentation of carbohydrates, an indicator of inflammatory bowel disease or carbohydrate malabsorption.
hydrogen cyanide
hydrocyanic acid.
heavy hydrogen
hydrogen having double the mass of ordinary hydrogen; deuterium.
hydrogen ion balance
hydrogen ion concentration
the degree of concentration of hydrogen ions (the acid element) in a solution. Its symbol is pH, and expresses the degree to which a solution is acidic or alkaline. The pH range extends from 0 to 14, pH 7 being neutral. A pH of less than 7 indicates acidity, above 7 indicates alkalinity. See also acid-base balance and ph.
hydrogen peroxide
H2O2, used in solution as an antibacterial agent. A 3% solution foams on touching skin or mucous membrane and appears to have a mechanical cleansing action.
hydrogen peroxide-based teat dips
hydrogen sulfide
an ill-smelling, colorless, poisonous gas, H2S; much used as a chemical reagent. Hydrogen sulfide is often present in gases from oil wells and from manure vats under slatted floor barns. Poisoning of cattle causes diarrhea, dehydration, dyspnea and death in convulsions. The feces are black and the breath smells of hydrogen sulfide. Called also hydrosulfuric acid. See also manure pit gas poisoning.
hydrogen swell
defective canned meat can. Can is distended due to production of hydrogen as a result of corrosion of the can surface.

peroxide

that oxide of any element containing more oxygen than any other; more correctly applied to compounds having such linkage as −O−O−.

hydrogen peroxide
see hydrogen peroxide.
peroxide value
said of a feed sample; an indication of the degree of rancidity of oils and fats in the feed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tuker et al28 Bailey et al29 concluded in their studies that 10-16% carbamide peroxide bleaching gels may lead to a slight increase in surface roughness and amount of porosities of microfilled and hybrid composite resins However, when surface reflectance was analyzed the study showed significant changes in microfilled and hybrid composite resins after application of highly concentrated tooth bleaching agents containing 35% hydrogen peroxide.
This pilot study marks the first step in establishing the superiority of hydrogen peroxide with chlorhexidine over the lone usage of chlorhexidine in reducing the aerosol contamination produced during scaling.
It was further stated that pantothenate had no appreciable reaction with hydrogen peroxide.
215 per cent hydrogen peroxide - also double the limit - even though its label said it was within legal limits.
A bicarbonate-activated hydrogen peroxide system has been found (Flangan et al.
Scheduled to be operational in the second half of 2015, the plant is intended to supply hydrogen peroxide as a raw material for the manufacture of propylene oxide (PO) by Sadara at its integrated chemicals complex.
Hydrogen peroxide was first detected on Europa by NASA's Galileo mission, which explored the Jupiter system from 1995 to 2003, but Galileo observations were of a limited region.
Results showed that the hydrogen peroxide treatment reduced by 64 percent the number of patients who Later became contaminated with any of the most common drug-resistant organisms, Perl said.
Our considerable experience in reactive chemicals enabled us to provide pump and safety valve solutions for the hydrogen peroxide loading rigs.
According to the company, urea allows carbamide peroxide to break down more slowly, giving it a longer shelf life of one to two years, compared with hydrogen peroxide, which has a shelf life of only one to two months.
The assay for hydrogen peroxide was adapted from Barnard and Stinson (1999).

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