hydrogen peroxide


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hydrogen

 (H) [hi´dro-jen]
a chemical element, atomic number 1, atomic weight 1.00797. (See Appendix 6.) It exists as the mass 1 isotope (protium, or light or ordinary hydrogen), mass 2 isotope (deuterium, heavy hydrogen), and mass 3 isotope (tritium).
hydrogen cyanide an extremely poisonous colorless liquid or gas, HCN, a decomposition product of various naturally occurring glycosides and a common cause of cyanide poisoning. Inhalation of the gas can cause death within a minute. Called also hydrocyanic acid.
heavy hydrogen deuterium.
hydrogen ion concentration the degree of concentration of hydrogen ions (the acid element) in a solution. Its symbol is pH, and it expresses the degree to which a solution is acidic or alkaline. The pH range extends from 0 to 14, pH 7 being neutral, a pH of less than 7 indicating acidity, and one above 7 indicating alkalinity. See also acid-base balance.
hydrogen peroxide H2O2, an antiseptic with a mildly antibacterial action. A 3 per cent solution foams on touching skin or mucous membrane and appears to have a mechanical cleansing action.
hydrogen sulfide H2S, a poisonous gas with an offensive smell, released from decaying organic material, natural gas, petroleum, and sulfur deposits, and sometimes used as a chemical reagent.

hy·dro·gen pe·rox·ide

an unstable compound readily broken down to water and oxygen, a reaction catalyzed by various powdered metals and by the enzyme, catalase; a 3% solution is used as a mild antiseptic for skin and mucous membranes.

hydrogen peroxide

n.
A colorless, heavy, strongly oxidizing liquid, H2O2, capable of reacting explosively with combustibles and used principally in aqueous solution as a mild antiseptic, bleaching agent, oxidizing agent, and laboratory reagent.

hy·dro·gen pe·rox·ide

(hīdrō-jen pĕr-oksīd)
Unstable compound readily broken down to water and oxygen, a reaction catalyzed by various powdered metals and by the enzyme, catalase.
Synonym(s): hydroperoxide.

hydrogen peroxide

A powerful oxidizing and antibacterial agent. It is formulated as a cream for external use on skin infections, ulcers and pressure sores. Brand names are Crystacide and Hioxyl.

Hydrogen peroxide

A colorless, unstable compound of hydrogen and oxygen (H2O2). An aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide is used as an antiseptic and bleaching agent.
Mentioned in: Ozone Therapy

antiseptic 

An agent that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria. This term is generally restricted to agents that are sufficiently non-toxic for superficial application to living tissues. These include the preservatives for eye drops and contact lens solutions. Examples of antiseptics are alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, chlorbutanol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, thimerosal (or thiomersalate). Other agents that are too toxic to be applied to living tissues are called disinfectants and are used to sterilize instruments and apparatus. See disinfection; ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid; neutralization; sterilization.

hy·dro·gen pe·rox·ide

(hīdrō-jen pĕr-oksīd)
Unstable compound readily broken down to water and oxygen used as a mild antiseptic for skin and mucous membranes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keenan and team found that the collagen present in dentin becomes fragmented when exposed to hydrogen peroxide, which leads to the loss of collagen mass in that layer.
(26) studied the effectiveness of a 0.5% hydrogen peroxide irrigation to control bleeding after adenoidectomy.
The third treatment relies on mostly vitamins B and C to further help the blood vessels recover from the workout they may receive from hydrogen peroxide and chelation.
The hydrogen peroxide market in North America has improved significantly in recent years, with AkzoNobel well placed to grow the business," said Werner Fuhrmann, AkzoNobel's Executive Committee member responsible for Specialty Chemicals.
Barghi and Morgan11 reported that Irreversible soft tissue burns can be easily produced by using powerful in-office bleaching (30-35% hydrogen peroxide) that changes the color of soft tissue to white.
Hence, in this pilot study, the efficacy of preconditioning using 1.5% hydrogen peroxide followed by rinsing with 0.2% chlorhexidine was evaluated over chlorhexidine alone, with saline as a negative control in reducing the microbial counts in the aerosol produced during ultrasonic scaling.
The following sections cite data found on the interactions of certain B vitamins with superoxide or hydrogen peroxide, the intermediate agents believed chiefly responsible for the effect of ascorbate on malignant cells.
This is one more brick in the wall of evidence supporting hydrogen peroxide's safety and power.
All whitening gels contain bleach, usually hydrogen peroxide, which strips stains from enamel and brightens teeth from outside in.
Evonik Industries AG, an Essen, Germany-based specialty chemical supplier, claims that the use of hydrogen peroxide can solve an old processing problem while significantly increasing the amount of copper extracted from ore.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Iranian researchers produced electromagnetic nanocomposite made of iron oxide and polyfuran magnetic nanoparticles and succeeded in the synthesis of electrochemical biosensor sensitive to hydrogen peroxide.
Hydrogen peroxide is one of the most popular chemicals used for contaminated soil treatment by chemical oxidation (Watts, Teel 2006).

Full browser ?